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Giles v. Chicago Drum

April 22, 2009

BOBBY GILES, INDIVIDUALLY, AND AS SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF JANNIE GILES, DECEASED, PLAINTIFFS,
v.
CHICAGO DRUM, INC., ET AL., DEFENDANTS.
RONALD JONES JR., SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR FOR THE ESTATE OF KEJUAN DICKENS, DECEASED, ET AL., PLAINTIFFS,
v.
CHICAGO DRUM, INC., ET AL., DEFENDANTS.
MARY E. TUFF, AS SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR FOR THE ESTATE OF DOUGLAS TUFF, DECEASED, ET AL., PLAINTIFFS,
v.
CHICAGO DRUM, INC., ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Judge Rebecca R. Pallmeyer

MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

Plaintiffs in these cases are 77 Illinois residents who lived or worked near the Acme Barrel Drum Reconditioning Facility on Chicago's near west side. Acme Barrel was engaged in the business of cleaning and reconditioning used industrial containers that had contained hazardous or toxic chemicals or waste products. The cleaning process involved incineration or flushing with a caustic solution; the drums were then painted and sold to industrial manufacturers for reuse. Plaintiffs in these cases claim that Acme operated as an unlicensed hazardous waste disposal facility in violation of local, state, and federal environmental laws and that Plaintiff suffered harm from the resulting contamination. The Defendants are Acme's owners and operators and the industrial customers.

The cases have been pending in the Circuit Court of Cook County since May 2003, when the first of three cases now consolidated here was filed as a class action. A second class action was filed a month later, and a subset of the plaintiffs in the first complaint filed a third case in April 2007. Then in May 2007, the state court dismissed Plaintiff's class allegations, leaving seventy-seven individual claims for relief.

These claims presumably would have remained in state court were it not for the filing of Plaintiffs' Sixth Amended Complaint on August 1, 2008. In that complaint, Plaintiffs alleged for the first time claims of civil conspiracy. Plaintiffs allege generally that Defendants conspired to unlawfully process hazardous wastes, in violation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ("RCRA"), 42 U.S.C. § 6901 et seq. and the Illinois Environmental Protection Act ("ILEPA"), 415 ILCS 5/20 et seq. Two weeks after the filing of the Sixth Amended Complaint, Defendants removed the case to federal court. They contend this court has federal question jurisdiction because the complaint presents a federal conspiracy claim which implicates "significant federal issues" as contemplated in Grable & Sons Metal Prods., Inc. v. Darue Engineering and Mfg., 545 U.S. 308 (2005).

Plaintiffs have moved for an order remanding the case. They cite cases in which citizens have brought state law tort claims against plant operators who released hazardous substances into the soil, air or groundwater. Courts have uniformly held that a reference to federal environmental statutes, including RCRA, in plaintiffs' negligence claims is insufficient to confer federal question jurisdiction. See Mulcahey v. Columbia Organic Chemicals Co., 29 F.3d 148 (4th Cir. 1994); Polcha v. A T & T Nassau Metals Corp., 837 F. Supp. 94 (M.D. Pa. 1993) (remanding state law negligence claim to state court, noting that RCRA creates no private cause of action for damages).

Defendants urge that Plaintiffs' conspiracy allegations, and the Supreme Court's decision in Grable & Sons, change the landscape on this issue. In Grable & Sons, the Court acknowledged that federal question jurisdiction ordinarily requires a cause of action created by federal law. In addition, however, the Court carved out a narrow class of state law claims that "necessarily raise a stated federal issue, actually disputed and substantial, which a federal forum may entertain without disturbing any congressionally approved balance of federal and state judicial responsibilities." 545 U.S. at 314. For the reasons explained here, the court concludes the rationale of Grable & Sons does not support the exercise of federal jurisdiction in the circumstances of these cases, and orders them remanded to state court.

DISCUSSION

A case arises under federal law if it appears on the face of the plaintiff's complaint either that a federal law creates the cause of action or, that the plaintiff's right to relief necessarily depends on resolution of a substantial question of federal law. See 13B CHARLES ALAN WRIGHT, ARTHUR R. MILLER & EDWARD H. COOPER, FEDERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE § 3562 (2d Ed. 1984 & Supp. 2008); citing Franchise Tax Board v. Construction Laborers Vacation Trust, 463 U.S. 1 (1983); see also ERWIN CHEMERINKSY, FEDERAL JURISDICTION § 5.2 (5th Ed.). Removal is appropriate only if the suit could originally have been filed in federal court. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. v. Thompson, 478 U.S. 804 (1986). Courts generally disfavor removal, and recognize that the "removal statute should be construed narrowly and against removal." Illinois v. Kerr-McGee Chem. Corp., 677 F.2d 571 (7th Cir. 1982).

Grable & Sons recognized federal jurisdiction over state quiet title action.

Because RCRA does not create a private cause of action for conspiracy, Defendants necessarily assert that resolution of Plaintiffs' state conspiracy claim implicates a substantial federal interest. They cite Grable & Sons Metal Prods., Inc. v. Darue Eng'g & Mfg., 545 U.S. 308 (2005). Grable held that the appropriate inquiry for determining whether a complaint raises a substantial question of federal law is whether "a state-law claim necessarily raise[s] a stated federal issue, actually disputed and substantial, which a federal forum may entertain without disturbing any congressionally approved balance of federal and state judicial responsibilities." Id. at 314. Thus, after Grable, federal question jurisdiction over a state action will exist where (1) there is a substantial and disputed federal issue, and (2) the exercise of federal jurisdiction will not upset the balance of labor between state and federal courts.

In Grable, the IRS had seized plaintiff's property and given notice of its sale to the defendant only by certified mail. Plaintiff brought a quiet title action in state court, arguing that defendant's title was invalid because federal law requires IRS to give notice by personal service. Id. at 310-11.The Court concluded that the case warranted federal jurisdiction in part because the federal statute was not only "actually in dispute" but was also "the only legal or factual issue contested in the case." Id. at 315. The court also noted the federal government's interest in vindicating its own administrative action: "The Government has a strong interest in 'prompt and certain collection of delinquent taxes,' and the ability of the IRS to satisfy its claims from the property of delinquents requires clear terms of notice to allow buyers . . . to satisfy themselves that the [Internal Revenue] Service has . . . good title." Id. at 315 (citations omitted). Finally, the court emphasized the rarity of this kind of case and the ultimately "microscopic effect" the exercise of federal jurisdiction would have on the "federal-state division of labor." Id.

Significantly, Grable distinguished, but did not overrule, the Court's earlier holding in Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. v. Thompson, 478 U.S. 804 (1986). In Merrell Dow, consumers had sued a drug manufacturer in state court, alleging that the drug caused birth defects. The drug manufacturer removed the case to federal court based in part on plaintiffs' allegations that the manufacturer's violation of the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act constituted negligence. The Sixth Circuit concluded that removal was improper. Affirming that conclusion, the Supreme Court noted that Congress declined to create a private right of action for the alleged FDC Act violation; under those circumstances, plaintiffs' allegation of an FDC Act violation as an element of their state tort claim was insufficient to support federal jurisdiction. 478 U.S. 804. Seizing upon this rationale, the plaintiff in Grable & Sons noted that federal law also does not provide a right of action for quiet title. The Court was unpersuaded; it noted that the absence of a private cause of action in Merrell Dow was important but not determinative of whether a state-law claim could ever trigger federal jurisdiction. Rather, the absence of a federal private cause of action was relevant insofar as granting federal jurisdiction would have resulted in "a potentially enormous shift of traditionally state cases into federal court," an outcome Congress could have sanctioned (but did not) by creating a private right to sue. 545 U.S.at 319. Allowing federal-question jurisdiction with respect to Grable's claims, by contrast, would have comparatively little impact on the federal case load, as state title cases rarely raise actually disputed matters of federal law. Id. at 315.

The Grable standard for exercise of federal jurisdiction is stringently applied.

A year later, the Supreme Court distinguished Grable in Empire Healthchoice Assur., Inc. v. McVeigh, 547 U.S. 677 (2006). In that case, Empire Healthchoice, the health insurer for federal employees, sued to recover health insurance benefits it had paid; the insurance beneficiary had recovered damages for his injuries in a state court tort action, but then refused to reimburse the employer as required by the terms of the insurance agreement. The insurer's claim arose under state contract law, but the insurer noted that the Federal Employees Health Benefits Act ("FEHBA") vested federal district courts with original jurisdiction to hear suits challenging the denial of benefits, and the FEHBA was a necessary element of the insurer's claim. The Court, however, rejected any analogy to Grable, emphasizing "the special and small category" to which it belonged. Id. at 699. The Court noted, first, that the meaning of the federal tax provision in Grable was the only contested issue in that case. Further, Grable "presented a nearly pure issue of law, one that could be settled once and for all and thereafter would govern numerous tax cases." Id. at 700-01 (quotations and citations omitted). Empire's reimbursement claim, on the other hand, was "fact-bound and situation-specific," with the parties haggling over the existence of overcharges and duplicative charges by the insurer. Id. at 701. Also in contrast to Grable, the claim in Empire HealthChoice was not triggered "by the action of any federal department, agency, or service, but by the ...


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