Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Wolfe v. Wolf

August 17, 2007

GINA M. WOLFE, PLAINTIFF-APPELLANT,
v.
ILENE WOLF, DEFENDANT-APPELLEE.



Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County. No. 05 L 3590 Honorable Jeffrey Lawrence, Judge Presiding.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Presiding Justice O'brien

Published opinion

This appeal involves two cases that were consolidated before the trial court, one being a legal malpractice action brought by the plaintiff, and the other a breach of contract action brought by the defendant to which plaintiff had filed a counterclaim. Plaintiff appeals the order of the circuit court granting defendant's motion under section 2-619 of the Code of Civil Procedure (735 ILCS 5/2-619 (West 2000)) to dismiss plaintiff's legal malpractice complaint and her counterclaim in the defendant's breach of contract action. On appeal, plaintiff argues the trial court erred in ruling that judicial estoppel barred plaintiff from bringing her legal malpractice complaint and her counterclaim. We reverse and remand for further proceedings.

On or about May 10, 2003, plaintiff retained defendant to represent her in the underlying divorce proceeding, In re the Marriage of Gina M. Pinsler and Bruce Pinsler. After negotiations, plaintiff entered into a settlement agreement with her former husband on advice from defendant that the agreement was the "best [plaintiff] could do" and that the terms would give plaintiff more than if the case were to go to trial. The settlement agreement was incorporated into the judgment for dissolution of marriage granted on June 9, 2004. At the prove up, plaintiff testified that she understood the terms of the settlement, and she also agreed to waive maintenance.

On December 14, 2004, defendant filed a complaint against plaintiff for breach of contract regarding plaintiff's failure to pay for services rendered in the divorce proceeding. Plaintiff filed a counterclaim alleging that defendant had engaged in legal malpractice. On March 31, 2005, plaintiff filed a separate legal malpractice action against defendant. Plaintiff alleged in her legal malpractice action that defendant had failed to discover hundreds of thousands of dollars in the possession of the ex-husband at the time she entered into the agreement. Furthermore, plaintiff alleged that defendant had wrongly informed her that she was not a candidate for maintenance, and she negligently failed to inform plaintiff of her right to interim attorney fees. Plaintiff's complaint for legal malpractice and defendant's complaint for breach of contract were consolidated into a single case.

On September 14, 2005, defendant filed a section 2-619 motion to dismiss the malpractice case. Defendant argued that plaintiff's malpractice claims were barred by her testimony at the prove up that she understood and agreed to the terms of the settlement agreement. Defendant asked the court to dismiss the malpractice claims on the basis of judicial estoppel. The trial court granted the motion on December 7, 2005, dismissing plaintiff's legal malpractice action and her counterclaim to plaintiff's complaint for breach of contract. Plaintiff filed a motion to reconsider that was denied on January 9, 2006. Defendant's cause of action for breach of contract was severed and transferred. On January 13, 2006, plaintiff filed this timely appeal of the order dismissing her legal malpractice action and her counterclaim to defendant's breach of contract action.

A section 2-619 motion to dismiss admits the legal sufficiency of the complaint, but asserts affirmative matter that avoids or defeats the claim. DeLuna v. Burciaga, 223 Ill. 2d 49, 59 (2006).

A section 2-619 motion to dismiss admits the truth of all well-pleaded facts in the complaint. Coady v. Harpo, Inc., 308 Ill. App. 3d 153, 158 (1999). The trial court's grant of a section 2-619 motion to dismiss is reviewed de novo. DeLuna, 223 Ill. 2d at 59.

Judicial estoppel provides that a party who asserts a particular position in a legal proceeding is estopped from asserting a contrary position in a subsequent legal proceeding. Bidani v. Lewis, 285 Ill. App. 3d 545, 550 (1996). The doctrine of judicial estoppel is designed to protect the integrity of the courts by preventing litigants from deliberately shifting positions to suit the exigencies of the moment. Bidani, 285 Ill. App. 3d at 550. For judicial estoppel to apply, five elements must be present: (1) the party estopped must have taken two positions; (2) that are factually inconsistent; (3) in a separate judicial or quasi-judicial administrative proceeding; (4) intending the trier of fact to accept the truth of the facts alleged; and (5) have succeeded in the first proceeding and received a benefit thereby. Larson v. O'Donnell, 361 Ill. App. 3d 388, 398 (2005). This court has held that for judicial estoppel to apply, the two positions taken must be "totally inconsistent." (Emphasis added.) Bidani, 285 Ill. App. 3d at 550.

Defendant argues that at the dissolution proceeding, plaintiff unequivocally testified that she understood and agreed to all the terms of the marital settlement agreement and she testified that she took a "full, complete part" in negotiating the terms of the agreement. Defendant contends that plaintiff's testimony at the dissolution proceeding is totally inconsistent with her claim in her malpractice complaint that she did not understand and agree to the marital settlement.

Review of the record indicates that plaintiff's testimony at the dissolution proceeding is not totally inconsistent with her malpractice complaint. In her malpractice complaint, plaintiff alleged that her testimony at the dissolution proceeding had been predicated on several negligent acts and misrepresentations made to her by the defendant, and that she did not discover those negligent acts and misrepresentations until after the settlement agreement had been entered and the dissolution proceeding had been completed. Specifically, plaintiff alleged that defendant failed to have appraisals made of the ex-husband's numerous business interests; never obtained and/or analyzed financial records of the ex-husband's numerous business ventures; refused to work with a forensic accountant who previously had been retained to investigate the ex-husband's assets and business transactions; failed to discover and recover hundreds of thousands of dollars that the ex-husband had dissipated or concealed; failed to advise her about her right to seek interim attorney fees; and failed to advise her that she was eligible for reviewable maintenance.

In connection with her malpractice complaint, plaintiff filed an affidavit in which she similarly stated that her testimony at the dissolution proceeding had been predicated on several negligent acts and misrepresentations made to her by the defendant. Specifically, plaintiff stated in her affidavit that defendant failed to discover and recover "hundreds of thousands of dollars" in her ex-husband's possession; misrepresented to plaintiff that there were no tools to be used to discover such financial information; misrepresented to plaintiff that she was ineligible to receive substantial maintenance; and told plaintiff she would not take the case to trial without more money, but failed to advise plaintiff of her right to seek interim attorney fees that would have enabled plaintiff to go to trial.

Plaintiff contends that, had defendant conducted meaningful discovery of the husband's assets and informed her that she was eligible for maintenance and for interim attorney fees, she would not have entered into the settlement agreement.

There is nothing inconsistent about the plaintiff entering a settlement agreement and testifying in support thereof based on representations made to her by the defendant, and later filing a malpractice complaint based on the discovery that the representations made to her by the defendant allegedly were false. This, then, is not a case in which the plaintiff deliberately has shifted positions to suit the exigencies of ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.