Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Black & Decker Inc. v. Robert Bosch Tool Corp.

October 24, 2006

BLACK & DECKER INC. AND BLACK & DECKER (U.S.) INC., PLAINTIFFS,
v.
ROBERT BOSCH TOOL CORPORATION, DEFENDANT.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Amy J. St. Eve, District Court Judge

MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

Plaintiffs Black & Decker Inc. and Black & Decker (U.S.) Inc. (collectively "Black & Decker") brought this lawsuit against Defendant Robert Bosch Tool Corporation ("Bosch") alleging infringement of various claims of U.S. Patent Nos. 6,308,059 (the "'059 patent") and 6,788,925 (the "'925 patent"). Specifically, Black & Decker accused Bosch's Power Box radio of infringing each of the patents-in-suit that relate to rugged jobsite radios. On September 22, 2006, a jury returned a verdict finding that the Bosch Power Box radio chargers at issue infringed certain claims of both patents-in-suit. The jury also found the infringement to be willful. After the jury trial, the Court conducted a bench trial on Bosch's defense that the '059 and '925 patents are unenforceable due to inequitable conduct. For the following reasons, the Court denies Bosch's inequitable conduct claim.

BACKGROUND

I. Patents-in-Suit -- The Domes Patents

Joseph Domes ("Domes") is the inventor of both the '059 and '925 patents. On December 12, 1997, Domes filed a patent application, serial number 60/069,372 ("Domes I").

The '059 patent claims priority over the Domes I patent application and was filed on December 11, 1998. The '059 patent entitled "Ruggedized Tradesworker Radio" issued on October 23, 2001. The '925 patent entitled "Ruggedized Tradesworker Radio" was filed on August 10, 2002 and issued on September 7, 2004. The '925 patent is a continuation of the '059 patent.

II. The Smith Patents

On September 15, 1998, Black & Decker filed the first patent application relating to the DeWalt jobsite radio with named inventor Roger Q. Smith that had serial number 09/153,621 ("Smith I"). The patent application that ultimately issued as U.S. Patent No. 6,427,070 ("Smith II" or the "'070 patent"), is a continuation of the Smith I application. Smith II was filed on March 4, 1999 and issued on July 30, 2002. The patent application that ultimately issued as U.S. Patent No. 6,496,688 ("Smith III" or the "'688 patent") is a continuation of the Smith II application, which was filed on May 6, 2002 and issued on December 17, 2002. Last, United States Patent No. 6,977,481 ("Smith IV" or the "'481 patent") is a continuation of the Smith III application, which was filed on October 15, 2002 and issued on December 20, 2005.

III. Prosecution of the Domes Patents

During the prosecution of the '059 patent -- the first Domes patents-in-suit -- no one associated with the prosecution of the patent disclosed the Smith I patent application, the patent application that ultimately issued as the '070 patent, or the '070 patent to the Patent and Trademark Office ("PTO"). Further, during the prosecution of the second Domes patent-in-suit, -- the '925 patent -- no one associated with the prosecution of the patent disclosed the Smith I patent application, the Smith II patent application, the '070 patent, or the patent application that ultimately issued as the '688 patent to the PTO.

Meanwhile, in 1999 Domes contacted Black & Decker and accused the DeWalt jobsite radio -- based on the Smith patents -- of infringing his Ruggedized Tradesworker Radio patents after which Black & Decker agreed to acquire a license to use the technology from Domes. In July 2003, Black & Decker acquired all rights under both Domes patents.

ANALYSIS

I. Duty of Candor and Good Faith

Bosch contends that the '059 and '925 patents are unenforceable because Black & Decker's patent attorney, Adan Ayala, breached his duty to disclose the Smith patents and Black & Decker's development documents (collectively the "Smith patents") during the prosecution of the Domes patents. Due to the ex parte nature of the patent application process, applicants have an express "duty of candor and good faith" that governs their dealings with the PTO. See 37 C.F.R. § 1.56(a) ("Each individual associated with the filing and prosecution of a patent application has a duty of candor and good faith in dealing with the [PTO]"); see also M. Eagles Tool Warehouse, Inc. v. Fisher Tooling Co., Inc., 439 F.3d 1335, 1339 (Fed. Cir. 2006) ("Patent applicants and those substantively involved in the preparation or prosecution of a patent application owe a 'duty of candor and good faith' to the PTO") (citation omitted). The duty of candor and good faith requires that the applicant disclose to the PTO all information "material to patentability." See 37 C.F.R. § 1.56(a). "A breach of this duty may constitute inequitable conduct, which can arise from a failure to disclose information material to patentability, coupled with an intent to deceive the PTO." M. Eagles Tool Warehouse, 439 F.3d at 1339. If the alleged infringer establishes inequitable conduct, the patent is rendered unenforceable. Liquid Dynamics Corp. v. Vaughan Co., 449 F.3d 1209, 1226 (Fed. Cir. 2006) (citation omitted); see also Molins PLC v. Textron, Inc., 48 F.3d 1172, 1182 (Fed. Cir. 1995).

II. Two-Step Analysis

The Court undertakes a two-step analysis when determining inequitable conduct. See Purdue Pharma L.P. v. Endo Pharms., Inc., 438 F.3d 1123, 1128 (Fed. Cir. 2006). First, where the inequitable conduct alleged is the failure to disclose material information, the alleged infringer must make the following threshold showings by clear and convincing evidence: (1) the information was material to patentability; and (2) the applicant failed to disclose the information with an intent to mislead the PTO. Id.; Liquid Dynamics Corp., 449 F.3d at 1226. Once the alleged infringer establishes the threshold findings of materiality and intent, the Court "must weigh them to determine whether the equities warrant a conclusion that inequitable conduct occurred." Purdue Pharma, 438 F.3d at 1128. On the other hand, if the alleged infringer fails to establish these threshold findings, the Court need not weigh materiality and intent to determine if the applicant's conduct is so culpable that the patent should be unenforceable. Juicy Whip, Inc. v. Orange Bang, Inc., 292 F.3d 728, 744-45 (Fed. Cir. 2002).

III. Intent to Deceive

The Court focuses on the "intent to deceive" element of inequitable conduct because it is dispositive. See Kingsdown Med. Consultant, Ltd. v. Hollister, Inc., 863 F.2d 867, 872 n.5 (Fed. Cir. 1988) (court need not address materiality if intent not established). Assuming, arguendo, that Bosch has met the threshold finding of materiality, the Court's inquiry is whether Ayala failed to disclose the Smith patents during the prosecution of the Domes patents with the intent to mislead the PTO.*fn1 See M. Eagles Tool Warehouse, 439 F.3d at 1339 (citing 37 C.F.R. ยง 1.56(a)). As the Federal Circuit recently reiterated, "[i]intent to deceive can not be inferred solely from the fact that information was not disclosed; there must be a factual basis for a finding of deceptive intent." Id. at 1340 (citation omitted). The element of "intent to deceive," however, need not be proven by direct evidence. Id. at 1341; see also Critikon, Inc. v. Becton Dickinson Vascular Access, Inc., 120 F.3d 1253, 1256 (Fed. Cir. 1997) ("direct evidence of intent or proof of deliberate scheming is rarely available in instances of inequitable conduct."). Instead, absent a credible explanation, "intent to deceive is generally inferred from the facts and circumstances surrounding a knowing failure to disclose material information." ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.