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People v. Brunt

March 27, 2002

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, PLAINTIFF-APPELLEE,
v.
PATRICK BRUNT, DEFENDANT-APPELLANT.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Justice South

Released for publication.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, PLAINTIFF-APPELLEE,
v.
PATRICK BRUNT, DEFENDANT-APPELLANT.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Justice South

PUBLISH

Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County. Honorable Dennis Porter, Judge Presiding.

Defendant, Patrick Brunt (petitioner), appeals from an order of the circuit court of Cook County dismissing his post-conviction petition without an evidentiary hearing for being untimely, as well as being frivolous and patently without merit. We affirm that dismissal on the basis that the petition was untimely.

On January 10, 1997, subsequent to a bench trial petitioner was convicted of felony murder, attempted murder and two counts of armed robbery, all based upon accountability. On February 14, 1997, he was sentenced to 35 years for murder and 20 years for attempted murder, both sentences to be served consecutively, and 15 years each for the two armed robbery convictions, both sentences to be served concurrently. Petitioner filed a motion to reconsider that sentence on February 26, 1997, which was denied that same day.

In an unpublished order, this court affirmed those convictions and sentences. People v. Brunt, No. 1-97-0935 (March 9,1999) (unpublished summary order under Supreme Court Rule 23). On February 18, 2000, petitioner filed a pro se petition for post-conviction relief. The circuit court dismissed that petition on the basis that it was untimely and contained allegations which were frivolous and patently without merit.

Petitioner has raised four issues for our consideration: (1) whether the reference in section 122-1(c) of the Post-Conviction Hearing Act (725 ILCS 5/122-1(c) (West 1998)) to "date of conviction" should include the time until a defendant's motion to reconsider the sentence is ruled upon; (2) whether under Apprendi v. New Jersey, 530 U.S. 466, 147 L. Ed. 2d 435, 120 S. Ct. 2348 (2000), his consecutive sentences for murder and attempted murder are unconstitutional; (3) whether the enactment of Public Act 83-942 (Pub. Act 83-942, eff. November 23, 1983) violates the single subject rule of the Illinois Constitution; and (4) whether one of the convictions for armed robbery must be vacated since a criminal defendant cannot be convicted of both felony murder and the underlying predicate felony.

Section 122-1(c) of the Post-Conviction Hearing Act (Act) sets forth the limitations periods applicable to the filing of petitions for post-conviction relief:

" No proceedings under this Article shall be commenced more than 6 months after the denial of a petition for leave to appeal or the date for filing such a petition if none is filed or more than 45 days after the defendant files his or her brief in the appeal of the sentence before the Illinois Supreme Court (or more than 45 days after the deadline for the filing of the defendant's brief with the Illinois Supreme Court if no brief is filed) or 3 years from the date of conviction, whichever is sooner, unless the petitioner alleges facts showing that the delay was not due to his or her culpable negligence." 725 ILCS 5/122-1(c) (West 1998).

Thus, the Act ties the timing of the post-conviction petition to one of three specific events: (1) the filing or possible filing of a petition for leave to appeal (PLA); (2) the filing of a brief in appeal of the sentence to our supreme court, or (3) the date of conviction. The Act specifies different time periods as to each reference point -within six months from the denial of a petition for leave to appeal (or the due date of such a petition if one is not filed), within 45 days from the filing of the defendant's brief where the appeal is taken by our supreme court (or the due date of the brief if none is actually filed), or three years from the defendant's conviction. The Act provides that the shortest time period, the earliest date, be used. In People v. Reed, 302 Ill. App. 3d 1007 (1999), the reviewing court described the logical relationship between the three limitations periods as follows:

"The six-month limitation applies when there has been an appeal to the appellate court, which triggers 'a denial of a [PLA] or the date for filing such.' The 45-day period applies to cases going directly to our supreme court (e.g., a capital case) or in cases where a PLA is granted. Finally, the provision limiting post-conviction petitions to within three years of the date of conviction applies to all other cases ***. Thus, each possible post-conviction avenue of appeal (including the decision not to appeal) is provided for under the Act with its own discrete and specific time limit for a post-conviction petition." Reed, 302 Ill. App. 3d at 1009.

Since this case does not involve a direct appeal to the supreme court, the 45-day period is not applicable. Furthermore, the three-year date is not applicable because a direct appeal was filed to this court. Therefore, based upon the clear language of the Act the six-month period applies because after this court ruled on the direct appeal, petitioner had six months or until September ...


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