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People v. Williams

July 06, 2000

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, APPELLEE, V. BOBBY O. WILLIAMS, APPELLANT.


The opinion of the court was delivered by: Justice McMORROW

Agenda

2-September 1998.

Following a jury trial in the circuit court of St. Clair County, the defendant, Bobby O. Williams, was convicted of the first degree murder of Sharon Bushong. The same jury found defendant eligible for the death penalty. Following a hearing in aggravation and mitigation, the jury found that there were no factors sufficient to preclude imposition of the death penalty and sentenced defendant to death. Defendant's conviction and sentence have been stayed pending direct review by this court. Ill. Const. 1970, art. VI, §4(b); 134 Ill. 2d Rs. 603, 609(a).

BACKGROUND

Shortly before 1 a.m. on November 3, 1994, Sharon Bushong was shot to death during a robbery of the Convenient Food Mart at 9618 West Main Street in Belleville, Illinois. At the time of her death, Bushong was working in the convenience store as the sole clerk. The principal pieces of physical evidence recovered from the crime scene were a surveillance videotape that had been recorded by the store's security cameras, and a spent cartridge case that had been fired from a .380-caliber pistol. Several fingerprints were collected from the convenience store, but none matched defendant's. In addition, a .380-caliber bullet was recovered from Bushong's body during her autopsy.

The surveillance videotape was played for the jury at trial and is part of the record on appeal. The videotape shows, simultaneously, the views from four cameras placed in different locations in the store. Two of the cameras are positioned behind the store's counter, providing views of the cash register. The videotape is recorded in black and white and has no sound. A date and time display is included on the tape.

The surveillance videotape shows two African-American males entering the convenience store at 12:49 a.m. *fn1 on November 3, 1994. One of the men is wearing shorts and a short-sleeve, dark-colored shirt with piping or thin stripes around the collar, shoulders, sleeves and bottom. He is wearing only one, ankle-high sock. He is also wearing some type of light-colored garment, possibly boxer shorts, over his head. The second man is wearing a baseball cap, and is covering his face with his hands and shirt. Neither man's face is visible at any time.

The individual with the garment over his head can be seen on the videotape taking Bushong behind the store counter and then standing to Bushong's right as she opens the cash register drawer. After Bushong opens the drawer, the man raises his left hand and shoots Bushong in the head. Bushong immediately falls to the ground. The man then shifts the gun to his right hand and removes the money from the cash register drawer with his left hand. During this time, the second man, who is on the public side of the store counter, can be seen leaning over and reaching into a display rack filled with potato chips. After the shooter removes the money from the cash register, the two men leave the store.

Richard Vorder Bruegge, a forensic photographic examiner with the FBI, provided expert testimony regarding the surveillance videotape. Bruegge explained that, by using various analytical techniques, it is possible to determine the height of an individual in a photograph. Bruegge stated that he examined the surveillance videotape, and photographs made from the videotape, to determine the height of the shooter seen on the videotape. After describing his analysis to the jury, Bruegge stated that the results of his examination were consistent with a person whose height was six feet, one inch to six feet, two inches. Additional evidence presented at trial established that defendant's height is six feet, one inch. Testimony was also introduced which showed that defendant was left-handed.

On February 15, 1995, defendant was arrested in Washington Park, a town located north of Belleville in St. Clair County. Two other individuals, Fred Jones and Andrew Towns, were arrested at the same time. At the time of his arrest, defendant was carrying a .380-caliber pistol in his jacket. James Hall, a forensic firearms examiner for the Illinois State Police, testified that both the cartridge case discovered in the convenience store and the bullet recovered from Bushong's body were fired from the .380-caliber pistol taken from defendant.

Rico Edwards, defendant's neighbor in Washington Park, testified that he had known defendant for approximately 18 years. Edwards stated that, in the middle of November 1994, he saw a .380-caliber pistol on the floor of defendant's car. In court, Edwards was shown the gun that was taken from defendant at the time of his arrest in February 1995. Edwards stated that it looked like the one he had seen in defendant's car, but he was not certain that it was the same one. Edwards also indicated that the people he associated with regularly exchanged guns.

Michael Cook testified that he had known defendant for approximately a year and that he knew defendant through Tony Turner, defendant's uncle. Cook stated that he had seen defendant with a .380-caliber pistol on four or five occasions during the summer of 1994. Cook also stated that the weapon taken from defendant at the time of his arrest, which was shown to Cook in court, looked like the one defendant had been carrying in the summer of 1994. Cook explained that the weapon looked like the one defendant had in 1994 because it was scraped and scratched around the front of the barrel, and because it had lost some of its black coloring at the tip of the barrel. Cook also positively identified the shirt which the shooter was wearing in the surveillance videotape as one that defendant had worn while playing basketball in the summer of 1994. In addition, Cook stated that he had seen defendant wearing just one sock while playing basketball.

On cross-examination, Cook said that he could not remember when he told police that he recognized the shirt worn by the shooter in the videotape, though he was certain that he had told them. Cook also acknowledged that he had not told the police that he had seen defendant wearing only one sock. Cook further stated that the people he associated with regularly traded guns.

Lavarro Jenkins testified that he saw defendant with a .380- caliber handgun in January 1995. According to Jenkins, defendant showed him the gun while the two of them were driving in a car in Belleville. In court, Jenkins identified the gun taken from defendant at the time of his arrest as the gun which defendant had shown him in January 1995. Jenkins stated that he knew it was the same gun because he had offered to buy it from defendant. Jenkins also testified that, while he and defendant were discussing the gun, defendant said "there's a hot one on it." Jenkins explained that this was a slang term meaning that the gun had been used in a murder. Jenkins further stated that, while driving down "the 90's part" of West Main Street in Belleville, he and defendant passed a convenience store. At that point, according to Jenkins, defendant reached over, pointed to the convenience store and said "that's one of them."

On cross-examination, Jenkins admitted that he had been convicted of theft over $10,000 for stealing a car. He also acknowledged that there were two felony forgery counts pending against him, though he stated that the State had not offered him anything in exchange for his testimony at defendant's trial. Jenkins also stated that defendant never said that he, himself, had "committed a hot one" with the .380-caliber pistol. Like the prior witnesses, Jenkins indicated that it was common for the people he associated with to exchange guns back and forth.

Fred Jones, a friend of defendant, testified for the State pursuant to a plea agreement. Jones explained that, in exchange for his testimony, the State had agreed to dismiss a murder charge pending against him in St. Clair County and to recommend a 6- to 15-year sentence for armed robbery.

Jones testified that he saw defendant sometime after midnight on November 3 or November 4, 1994. At that time, defendant told him that he "and a couple more boys went up in Belleville to rob the convenience store and they shot the lady." Sometime after defendant told him about the murder, Jones saw that defendant was carrying a black, .380-caliber pistol. Jones identified the gun taken from defendant at the time of his arrest as the gun that defendant had with him in November 1994. Jones explained that he knew it was the same gun because he had seen defendant with it on several different occasions. Jones further stated that defendant called the gun his "Baby." Jones also identified the shirt worn by the shooter in the surveillance videotape as the one defendant was wearing when Jones saw him on November 3 or 4. In addition, Jones stated that, having played football with defendant, he knew that defendant was left-handed.

Jones was extensively cross-examined regarding six separate, conflicting statements which he had given to the police. In the first statement, given to police in early November 1994, Jones denied having any knowledge about the robbery of the Belleville convenience store or the murder of Bushong. The second statement was given to police on February 15, 1995, shortly after Jones was arrested, along with defendant, in Washington Park. In this statement, Jones again denied having any knowledge about the convenience store robbery or Bushong's murder. In the third statement, given on February 17, 1995, Jones said that he saw defendant "sometime after 11:00 p.m." on November 2, 1994, when defendant and two other individuals, Carvon Jones and Ricardo Spratt, picked Jones up in defendant's car. Jones said in this statement that both defendant and Spratt had guns, though Jones did not identify the types of weapons they had. Jones again said nothing in the third statement about the convenience store robbery or Bushong's murder.

The fourth statement was given to police on March 29, 1995, after Jones had been charged in the St. Clair County murder that later formed the basis of Jones' plea agreement with the state. In this fourth statement, Jones said that defendant picked him up at about 9 or 9:30 p.m., and that defendant told him that he intended to go to Belleville to rob someone. Jones also indicated that, while defendant was driving him to work a couple of days after November 3, 1994, defendant said that he "shot the lady in Belleville." In the fifth statement, given to police on May 15, 1995, Jones stated that defendant picked him up around 11:30. Jones again stated that defendant told him about Bushong's murder while driving to work. The sixth statement was given to police on May 31, 1996, after Jones reached the plea agreement with the State. In this statement, which was similar to his direct testimony at trial, Jones made clear that Spratt and Carvon Jones were in the car with defendant when defendant said he robbed the convenience store in Belleville. Explaining the inconsistencies in the statements that he had given to the police, Jones stated that he had lied in his initial statements because he "was scared and didn't want to get [him]self no further involved in it." Jones also stated that the people he associated with exchanged guns back and forth.

Andrew Towns, defendant's cousin, testified that he remembered seeing defendant with a .380-caliber pistol in the early part of November 1994. Towns identified the gun taken from defendant at the time of his arrest as the one which defendant had in November based on a worn area on the tip of the gun's barrel. Towns acknowledged that when he was arrested along with defendant in February 1995, he was carrying his father's .38-caliber gun. Towns stated that he was a juvenile at the time of his arrest and that no charges had been filed in relation to the .38-caliber weapon. Towns also stated that sometime around November 1994, he overheard defendant and Ricardo Spratt laughing when defendant said, "Don't forget the chips." Towns asked defendant what the phrase meant. Defendant told Towns that he "and some more people robbed a liquor store or convenience store. And while they were running out the store, [defendant] yelled, `Don't forget the chips,' to another person." According to Towns, defendant also told him that "he shot the bitch" who worked at the convenience store. Towns also testified that he had seen defendant wearing a shirt like the one worn by the shooter in the surveillance videotape.

On cross-examination, Towns admitted that when he was first questioned by the police on February 15, 1995, he denied having any knowledge about the convenience store murder. Towns also acknowledged that he was questioned again by the police on March 8, 1995. On this occasion, Towns told the police that he had stolen from his father the .38-caliber weapon that he was carrying at the time of his arrest. The police, in turn, pointed out to Towns that the theft of the weapon was a crime. Subsequently, Towns told the police about defendant's statements regarding Bushong's murder. Towns acknowledged that he had been given immunity with respect to charges relating to the .38-caliber weapon, but he stated that the immunity was not given in exchange for his testimony. Towns also stated that he had seen defendant lend or trade his .380-caliber gun to defendant's uncle, Tony Turner.

The final witness for the State was Officer Calvin Dye of the Illinois State Police. Dye testified to the events surrounding defendant's arrest on February 15, 1999. On cross-examination, Dye was shown two photographs of Fred Hoffman, an early suspect in Bushong's murder. The pictures were taken on November 4, 1994, the day that Hoffman was arrested, and showed Hoffman wearing only one sock. Dye stated that this was significant because the shooter in the surveillance videotape was wearing only one sock.

Lucille Williams, defendant's grandmother and Andrew Towns' aunt, testified first for the defense. Williams stated that Towns did not have a good reputation for truthfulness in the community. Williams called Towns "a liar" and said that "other people say he be telling it the way the[y] want to hear it."

Carvon Jones testified that sometime early in November 1994, around midnight, he rode in defendant's car with defendant, Ricardo Spratt and Fred Jones. Carvon stated that, while in the car, he never heard defendant say anything about robbing a convenience store or shooting anyone. Carvon also stated that he saw Spratt and Fred Jones, but not defendant, carrying guns. Carvon indicated that the gun taken from defendant at the time of his arrest looked like the one that Spratt had been carrying, though he could not say that it was, in fact, the same gun.

On cross-examination, Carvon admitted that he had seen defendant with a .380-caliber gun in the past. He also acknowledged that in a statement given to the police in February 1995 he said that, while in the car in November 1994, Fred Jones had made a reference to "the white lady in Belleville."

The remainder of the defense's case consisted of brief testimony from various law enforcement officers. Thomas Gamboe, a forensic scientist with the Illinois State Police, stated that defendant's shoes did not match any of the footwear impressions found at the convenience store. Michael Harper, a Belleville police detective, testified that he recovered a spent, .380-caliber shell casing from Dewayne Willis' front porch. Orville Lester, a Belleville police officer, stated that he recovered a vehicle that police initially thought might have been used as the getaway vehicle in Bushong's murder. Finally, David Ellis, a Belleville police officer, testified that he transported defendant to the Belleville police station after his arrest in February 1995, and that defendant's street clothes, including his shoes, were taken from him.

After closing arguments, the jury was instructed on the alternative types of first degree murder. See 720 ILCS 5/9-1(a) (West 1994). The jury then returned a general verdict finding defendant guilty of the first degree murder of Sharon Bushong.

No testimony was presented at the eligibility phase of defendant's capital sentencing hearing. After arguments, the jury found the defendant eligible for the death penalty based upon two statutory aggravating factors: (1) murder in the course of another felony (720 ILCS 5/9-1(b)(6) (West 1994)); and (2) murder committed in a cold, calculated manner pursuant to a preconceived plan, scheme or design to take a human life (720 ILCS 5/9-1(b)(11) (West 1994)).

At the aggravation-mitigation phase of the sentencing hearing, the State introduced evidence that defendant had murdered a second individual, Carlos Robertson, shortly after murdering Bushong. Robertson's body was discovered by police in his Washington Park home in the afternoon of November 3, 1994. Robertson had been shot twice in the head with different guns. Ballistics evidence established that one of the guns used to kill Robertson was the same .380-caliber weapon that had been used to murder Bushong and that had been taken from defendant at the time of his arrest in February 1995.

Fred Jones testified again for the State at the aggravation-mitigation stage of sentencing. Jones stated that he had been charged in the murder of Carlos Robertson and that it was this offense which formed the basis of his plea agreement with the State. Jones also stated that he had known Robertson and had been preparing to move in with him before his murder. As he did at the guilt-innocence phase of trial, Jones explained that sometime after midnight, on November 3, 1994, defendant, Carvon Jones, and Ricardo Spratt picked Jones up in defendant's car. Jones stated that defendant picked him up because he wanted Jones to help "get [defendant] inside Carlos Robertson's house." According to Jones, defendant said that Robertson and two others, Ricardo Spratt and Gerald Simpson, had been with him when he robbed the convenience store in Belleville and "shot the lady." Defendant also said that Robertson and Simpson had driven off without him after the robbery and murder. After listening to defendant, Jones agreed to go with him to Robertson's house. At the house, Jones asked Robertson to open the door, while defendant and Spratt hid to the side. When Robertson opened the door, defendant and Spratt rushed in. Defendant and Spratt then shot and killed Robertson for having abandoned defendant at the Belleville convenience store.

Jones was cross-examined, as he was at the guilt-innocence phase of trial, regarding contradictory statements he had given to the police. Jones also admitted that it was only after reaching the plea agreement with the State that he fully explained the events surrounding Robertson's murder.

Howard Morgan, Bushong's father, read a victim impact statement to the jury. This concluded the evidence presented by the State in aggravation.

Carvon Jones testified for the defense in mitigation. As before, Carvon stated that, when he was in defendant's car with defendant, Ricardo Spratt, and Fred Jones on November 3, 1994, he saw only Spratt and Fred Jones carrying guns. Carvon also stated that after the group drove to Carlos Robertson's house, only Spratt and Fred Jones got out of the car. According to Carvon, defendant never left the car.

Shermane Turner, defendant's mother, also testified in mitigation. Turner stated that defendant had been an average student who graduated from high school on time. Defendant entered the Marines right after high school with Turner's encouragement because she "didn't want [him] on the streets." About a year after entering the Marines, defendant was honorably discharged after he was diagnosed with asthma. According to Turner, defendant had no prior criminal record. Turner stated that the murder of Bushong was "out of character" for defendant and "just not like him."

In rebuttal, Sergeant Gregory Fernandez, of the Illinois State Police, stated that Carvon Jones had given an oral statement indicating that defendant had gotten out of his car at Carlos Robertson's house. However, when Carvon gave his written statement to police, he stated that defendant remained in the car.

Following arguments, the jury returned a verdict finding that there were no mitigating factors sufficient to preclude the imposition of the death penalty. This appeal followed.

ANALYSIS

I. Pretrial and Trial Issues

A. Speedy Trial

Defendant was arrested in connection with the murder of Carlos Robertson on February 15, 1995. He was charged with that offense on February 17, 1995, and indicted on March 17, 1995. Defendant was tried before a jury for Robertson's murder, but the jury was unable to reach a verdict, and a mistrial was declared on July 18, 1996. On January 26, 1996, the St. Clair County grand jury returned an indictment charging defendant with the first degree murder of Sharon Bushong. Defendant was in continuous custody from the time he was arrested in February 1995 until the time he was charged with Bushong's murder.

Defendant alleges that his statutory right to a speedy trial was violated when the State delayed charging him with the murder of Bushong until January 1996. In support of this argument, defendant cites to the rule announced in People v. Williams, 94 Ill. App. 3d 241, 248-29 (1981):

"Where new and additional charges arise from the same facts as did the original charges and the State had knowledge of these facts at the commencement of the prosecution, the time within which trial is to begin on the new and additional charges is subject to the same statutory limitation that is applied to the original charges. Continuances obtained in connection with the trial of the original charges cannot be attributed to defendants with respect to the new and additional charges because these new and additional charges were not before the court when those continuances were obtained."

Defendant asserts that Bushong's murder arose from the "same facts" as the murder of Carlos Robertson because both murders stemmed from the robbery of the Convenient Food Mart. In addition, defendant maintains that the State knew, based on evidence available in February 1995, that the two offenses were related. According to defendant, continuances which he obtained in connection with the Robertson trial cannot be attributed to his trial for Bushong's murder. Therefore, according to defendant, the 120-day, statutory speedy-trial period (see 725 ILCS 5/103-5(a) (West 1996)) started, and expired, in the Bushong case months before these charges were filed.

This court has explained that, under the Williams rule, the speedy-trial period will begin running on the later charge at the same time it begins running on the earlier charge only if the two charges are subject to compulsory joinder under section 3-3(b) of the compulsory joinder provisions of the Criminal Code of 1961 (720 ILCS 5/3-3(b) (West 1994)). People v. Gooden, 189 Ill. 2d 209 (2000). Because the Williams rule applies only when the new and original charges are subject to compulsory joinder, we must determine whether, in the case at bar, the charge of murdering Sharon Bushong was subject to compulsory joinder with the charge of murdering Carlos Robertson.

Section 3-3(b) of the Criminal Code of 1961 provides:

"(b) If the several offenses are known to the proper prosecuting officer at the time of commencing the prosecution and are within the jurisdiction of a single court, they must be prosecuted in a single prosecution, *** if they are based on the same act." (Emphasis added.) 720 ILCS 5/3-3 (West 1992).

In this case, it is clear that the murder of Sharon Bushong and the murder of Carlos Robertson did not arise from the same act. The two crimes occurred at different times, in different places, involved different victims, and were driven by different motivations. That the shootings were related, under the State's theory of the case, does not alter this result. People v. Mueller, 109 Ill. 2d 378, 385 (1985) ("There is no requirement of joinder where multiple offenses arise from a series of related acts"). Consequently, because the charge of murdering Sharon Bushong was not subject to compulsory joinder with the charge of murdering Carlos Robertson, defendant's statutory right to a speedy trial was not violated.

B. Gerald Simpson's Statement

Prior to trial, defendant filed a motion seeking permission to introduce into evidence a statement given to police by Gerald Simpson, a cousin and roommate of Carlos Robertson. Shortly after police discovered Robertson's body on November 3, 1994, they questioned Simpson about his knowledge of the crime. Simpson initially denied knowing anything about the murder of Robertson or Bushong. However, on November 4, 1994, Simpson gave police a lengthy, written statement in which he admitted to being the second individual (the nonshooter) in the Convenient Food Mart the night that Bushong was murdered.

In his statement, Simpson explained that he, Carlos Robertson, and a man named "Fred" drove from Washington Park to Belleville around midnight on November 2, 1994. According to Simpson, Fred told him that they were going to Belleville to meet some women. When the group reached Belleville, Fred, who was driving, pulled into a convenience store. He then told the others that he was going to rob the store. Simpson asked him whether he was "for real." Fred started laughing and told Simpson to "come on." Fred and Simpson got out of the car while Robertson stayed behind. Fred put something that looked liked boxer shorts over his head, and told Simpson to "look out for him" as he and Simpson entered the store. Once they were inside the store, according to Simpson, "Fred started behind the counter and told the white girl to open up the cash register. The white girl opened up the cash register, Fred shot the white girl once, *** in the head. She fell to the floor and Fred took the money out of [the] cash register. Fred stuffed all of the money into his pants pocket." While Fred was robbing the store, Simpson tried to cover his face with his hands because he had seen a security camera when he entered the store. After robbing the store, Fred, Simpson and Robertson returned to Washington Park. Later, Fred murdered Robertson after the two had an argument.

Although Simpson did not say in his statement to the police what "Fred's" last name was, the record indicates that he subsequently identified Fred Hoffman as the individual who shot Bushong. Fred Hoffman was arrested by police for Bushong's murder but was not indicted, because, among other reasons, he was too short to match the height of the shooter in the surveillance videotape as determined by the FBI.

On November 7, 1994, Simpson gave another statement to the police. In this statement, Simpson again admitted to being at the Convenient Food Mart on the night that Sharon Bushong was murdered. However, on this occasion, Simpson explained that it was not "Fred" who shot Bushong, but rather Dewayne Willis. Willis is identified in the record as another roommate of Carlos Robertson. Willis was never charged in Bushong's murder because police believed he had a firm alibi.

Prior to trial, defendant filed a motion seeking permission to introduce into evidence the statement in which Simpson identifies "Fred" as the murderer of Bushong. According to defendant, the statement was admissible under the statement-against-penal-interest exception to the hearsay rule. Following argument, the trial court denied defendant's motion. Defendant now contends that the trial court erred in excluding Simpson's statement.

The general rule is that a third party's out-of-court statement that he committed a crime is hearsay and is inadmissible, even though the statement is against the declarant's penal interest. People v. Tate, 87 Ill. 2d 134, 143 (1981). However, where justice requires, and where there are sufficient indicia of reliability, such statements may be admitted under the statements-against-penal-interest exception to the hearsay rule. People v. Bowel, 111 Ill. 2d 58, 66 (1986), citing Chambers v. Mississippi, 410 U.S. 284, 302, 35 L. Ed. 2d 297, 313, 93 S. Ct. 1038, 1049 (1973). To determine whether a statement contains sufficient indicia of reliability, we look foremost to whether the statement is self-incriminating and against the declarant's interest. People v. Keene, 169 Ill. 2d 1, 29 (1995). We also look to whether the statement was made spontaneously to a close acquaintance shortly after the crime occurred; whether the statement was corroborated by other evidence; and whether there was adequate opportunity for cross-examination of the declarant. These latter factors "are indicia, not hard and fast requirements," and they need not all be present for a statement to be admitted. People v. House, 141 Ill. 2d 323, 390 (1990), citing Bowel, 111 Ill. 2d at 67; Keene, 169 Ill. 2d at 29. Ultimately, the question to be considered in deciding the admissibility of the statement is whether it was "made under circumstances that provide `considerable assurance' of its reliability by objective indicia of trustworthiness." Bowel, 111 Ill. 2d at 67, quoting Chambers, 410 U.S. at 300-01, 35 L. Ed. 2d at 311-12, 93 S. Ct. at 1048-49. Whether a statement is admissible under the statement-against-penal-interest exception to the hearsay rule is within the sound discretion of the trial court. Bowel, 111 Ill. 2d at 68.

The circumstances surrounding a statement may play an important role in determining whether the statement was actually against the declarant's penal interest when made. See generally 2 J. Strong, McCormick on Evidence §319(c), at 345 (4th ed. 1992). The record in the present case, however, gives us little indication of the circumstances under which Simpson's statement was made. Accordingly, our analysis is limited primarily to an examination of the statement itself.

In the statement which Simpson gave to police on November 4, 1994, he admitted driving to the Belleville convenience store with Bushong's murderer. He also admitted that "Fred" told him he was going to rob the store, and that "Fred" told Simpson to "look out for him" when they entered the store. Simpson also admitted to being in the Convenient Food Mart when the robbery and murder took place and to witnessing both events. Thus, in his November 4 statement, Simpson clearly implicated himself in the armed robbery of the convenience store and Bushong's murder. Indeed, as defendant points out, Simpson was charged and tried for Bushong's murder. And, at that trial, the prosecutor introduced Simpson's statement into evidence in an attempt to secure a conviction. *fn2 In light of the foregoing, we conclude that portions of Simpson's statement, on their face, were self-incriminating and against the declarant's penal interest.

Our conclusion that portions of Simpson's statement were against his penal interest does not complete our analysis. At trial, defendant did not seek to admit only those portions of Simpson's statement in which Simpson admitted to being present at the Convenient Food Mart. Rather, what defendant sought to have admitted were Simpson's statements identifying "Fred" as Bushong's murderer. These statements, however, were not directly against Simpson's penal interest. Thus, we must determine whether the fact that Simpson's statements naming "Fred" as Bushong's murderer are ...


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