Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

11/16/95 JOHN W. VONHOLDT v. BARBA & BARBA

November 16, 1995

JOHN W. VONHOLDT, JR., PLAINTIFF-APPELLANT,
v.
BARBA & BARBA CONSTRUCTION, INC., AN ILLINOIS CORPORATION, DEFENDANT-APPELLEE.



APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COOK COUNTY. HONORABLE JEROME ORBACH, JUDGE PRESIDING.

Released for Publication December 21, 1995. Petition for Leave to Appeal Allowed April 3, 1996.

Presiding Justice Hoffman delivered the opinion of the court: Cahill and Theis, JJ., concur.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Hoffman

PRESIDING JUSTICE HOFFMAN delivered the opinion of the court:

The plaintiff, John W. Vonholdt, Jr., appeals from an order of the circuit court dismissing his second-amended complaint which sought recovery against the defendant, Barba & Barba Construction, Inc., for breach of an implied warranty of habitability. In this appeal, the plaintiff invites this court to extend liability on an implied warranty of habitability theory beyond the builder-vendor of a new home to a builder that constructs a structural addition to an existing residence. For the reasons which follow, we decline the plaintiff's invitation and affirm the order dismissing his second-amended complaint.

The plaintiff alleges that he purchased a single family residence in Glenview, Illinois, on November 5, 1993. The residence is approximately 3200 square feet, 900 square feet of which consists of a multi-level addition constructed by the defendant in August 1982 for the plaintiff's predecessor in title. The defendant provided the labor, plans, and specifications for the construction and erected it from materials purchased by the defendant and paid for by the prior owner.

The plaintiff alleges that shortly after taking possession of the residence, he noticed a deflection of the wood flooring at the partition wall separating the master bedroom from the adjoining bathroom. The deflection created a depression in the floor which had been nearly concealed by thick carpeting. An investigation of the floor revealed that the addition was not constructed in accordance with the architectural plans approved by the Village of Glenview or the Glenview Building Code, which resulted in excessive stress on the floor joists and inadequate support for a portion of the roof and ceiling.

The plaintiff filed the instant action seeking recovery against the defendant for breach of an implied warranty of habitability. In response to the plaintiff's second-amended complaint, the defendant moved for dismissal pursuant to section 2-615 of the Code of Civil Procedure (735 ILCS 5/2-615 (West 1992)) contending, inter alia, that the plaintiff failed to state a cause of action because the residence purchased by him was not a new home and the defendant was not a builder-vendor. Finding both that the defendant was not a builder-vendor and that there was an absence of privity between the plaintiff and the defendant, the trial court dismissed the plaintiff's second-amended complaint and denied a subsequent motion to reconsider. This appeal followed.

Because the complaint in issue was dismissed under section 2-615, the only question before this court is whether the plaintiff's second-amended complaint states a cause of action upon which relief could be granted. The issue is one of law, and our review is de novo. Metrick v. Chatz (1994), 266 Ill. App. 3d 649, 651-52, 639 N.E.2d 198, 203 Ill. Dec. 159.

In Petersen v. Hubschman Construction Co. (1979), 76 Ill. 2d 31, 389 N.E.2d 1154, 27 Ill. Dec. 746, our supreme court first considered the implied warranty of habitability as it relates to a contract for the sale of a new residence by a builder-vendor. After noting that such an implied warranty, although of recent origin, had found substantial acceptance in a number of jurisdictions, the Petersen court held:

"Because of the vast change that has taken place in the method of constructing and marketing new houses, we feel that it is appropriate to hold that in the sale of a new house by a builder-vendor, there is an implied warranty of habitability which will support an action against the builder-vendor by the vendee for latent defects and which will avoid the unjust results of caveat emptor and the doctrine of merger. Many new houses are, in a sense, now mass produced. The vendee buys in many instances from a model home or from predrawn plans. The nature of the construction methods is such that a vendee has little or no opportunity to inspect. The vendee is making a major investment, inmany instances the largest single investment of his life. He is usually not knowledgeable in construction practices and, to a substantial degree, must rely upon the integrity and the skill of the builder-vendor, who is in the business of building and selling houses. The vendee has a right to expect to receive that for which he has bargained and that which the builder-vendor has agreed to construct and convey to him, that is, a house that is reasonably fit for use as a residence." ( Petersen, 76 Ill. 2d at 39-40.)

The court further held that the warranty exists as an independent undertaking collateral to the contract to convey, and is implied as a separate undertaking of the builder-vendor because of the unusual dependent relationship of the vendee to the vendor. Petersen, 76 Ill. 2d at 41.

In Redarowicz v. Ohlendorf (1982), 92 Ill. 2d 171, 441 N.E.2d 324, 65 Ill. Dec. 411, the supreme court extended the implied warranty of habitability from builder-vendors to subsequent purchasers, but limited the extension to latent defects which manifest themselves within a reasonable time after the purchase of the home. In so doing, the court held:

"It [the implied warranty of habitability] is a judicial innovation that has evolved to protect purchasers of new houses upon discovery of latent defects in their homes. While the warranty of habitability has roots in the execution of the contract for sale [citation], we emphasize that it exists independently [citation]. Privity of contract is not required. Like the initial purchaser, the subsequent purchaser has little opportunity to inspect the construction methods used in building the home. Like the initial purchaser, the subsequent purchaser is usually not knowledgeable in construction practices and must, to a substantial degree, rely upon the expertise of the person who built the home. If construction of a new house is defective, its repair costs should be borne by the responsible builder-vendor who created the latent defect. The compelling public policies underlying the implied warranty of ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.