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01/19/94 CONTOUR DESIGNS v. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION

January 19, 1994

CONTOUR DESIGNS, INC., APPELLANT,
v.
THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION ET AL. (STEPHEN CHAMINEAK, APPELLEE).



Appeal from Circuit Court of St. Clair County. No. 92MR222. Honorable Richard A. Aguirre, Judge Presiding.

McCULLOUGH, Rakowski, Woodward, Slater, Rarick

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Mccullough

PRESIDING JUSTICE McCULLOUGH delivered the opinion of the court:

Respondent employer Contour Designs, Inc., appeals from an order of the circuit court of St. Clair County confirming the decision of the Illinois Industrial Commission (Commission) awarding claimant Steven Chamineak $457.33 per week for life as compensation for his total and permanent disability. (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1991, ch. 48, par. 138.8(f).) The claimant was also awarded $2,127 for necessary first aid, medical, surgical, and hospital bills and $766.99 for travel expenses. Ill. Rev. Stat. 1991, ch. 48, par. 138.8(a).

The only issue raised on appeal is whether the Commission's finding of permanent total disability (PTD) was against the manifest weight of the evidence. We affirm.

In its decision, the Commission adopted the findings of the arbitrator. On July 28, 1988, claimant was working for respondent as a roofer. On that day, he experienced a fall of about 40 feet through a hole in a roof. As a result, claimant incurred multiple facial lacerations, a broken nose, a comminuted fracture of the right patella, a fracture of the right femur, and a fracture of the left calcaneus. He was subsequently diagnosed with a torn right medial meniscus, osteopenia of the left foot and ankle, myofascial pain syndrome, structural deformity of the right leg, instability of the lumbar spine, nerve irritation, paralumbar muscle spasm, and chronic sacroiliitis secondary to structural deformity of the right leg. His right leg no longer had a knee cap. It was also 1 1/2 inches shorter than the left leg. The difference in the legs affected his back. Claimant has been in constant pain since the accident. His leg was weak, gave out, and required the use of a brace. He used a cane for walking and could tolerate sitting for only about 45 minutes and then only with the right leg extended. His right leg could not be fully flexed or extended. He could stand without the use of a cane for five to 10 minutes, and with a cane for 15 to 20 minutes. He had difficulty driving and had handicap license plates. He had great difficulty sleeping at night due to discomfort. His back and hips caused pain radiating to the right leg. At times, the left foot and ankle became so swollen and painful that he could bear no weight on the left lower extremity.

In Ceco Corp. v. Industrial Comm'n (1983), 95 Ill. 2d 278, 286-87, 447 N.E.2d 842, 845-46, the Illinois Supreme Court stated:

"This court has frequently held that an employee is totally and permanently disabled when he 'is unable to make some contribution to the work force sufficient to justify the payment of wages.' (E.g., Gates Division, Harris-Intertype Corp. v. Industrial Com. (1980), 78 Ill. 2d 264, 268[, 399 N.E.2d 1308]; Arcole Midwest Corp. v. Industrial Com. (1980), 81 Ill. 2d 11, 15[, 405 N.E.2d 755].) The claimant need not, however, be reduced to total physical incapacity before a permanent total disability award may be granted. ( Interlake, Inc. v. Industrial Com. (1981), 86 Ill. 2d 168, 176[, 427 N.E.2d 103]; Inland Robbins Construction Co. v. Industrial Com. (1980), 78 Ill. 2d 271, 275[, 399 N.E.2d 1306].) Rather, a person is totally disabled when he is incapable of performing services except those for which there is no reasonably stable market. ( A.M.T.C. of Illinois, Inc. v. Industrial Com. (1979), 77 Ill. 2d 482, 487[, 397 N.E.2d 804].) Conversely, an employee is not entitled to total and permanent disability compensation if he is qualified for and capable of obtaining gainful employment without serious risk to his health or life. ( E.R. Moore Co. v. Industrial Com. (1978), 71 Ill. 2d 353, 362[, 376 N.E.2d 206].) In determining a claimant's employment potential, his age, training, education, and experiences should be taken into account. A.M.T.C. of Illinois, Inc. v. Industrial Com. (1979), 77 Ill. 2d 482, 489[, 397 N.E.2d 804]; E.R. Moore Co. v. Industrial Com. (1978), 71 Ill. 2d 353, 362[, 376 N.E.2d 206].

In considering the propriety of a permanent and total disability award, this court recently stated:

'* * * Once the employee has initially established that he falls in what has been termed the "odd-lot" category (one who, though not altogether incapacitated for work, is so handicapped that he will not be employed regularly in any well-known branch of the labor market (2 A. Larson, Workmen's Compensation sec. 57.51, at 10-164.24 (1980)), then the burden shifts to the employer to show that some kind of suitable work is regularly and continuously available to the claimant (2 A. Larson, Workmen's Compensation sec. 57.61, at 10-164.97 (1980)).' (Emphasis added.)"

If the employee is qualified for and capable of obtaining gainful employment without serious risk to his health or life, even if he does not obtain such work, then he is not entitled to PTD compensation. ( Reynolds v. Industrial Comm'n (1986), 151 Ill. App. 3d 695, 697, 502 N.E.2d 1178, 1179.) The determination of the Commission as to PTD will be upheld unless it is contrary to the manifest weight of the evidence. Ceco, 95 Ill. 2d at 288, 447 N.E.2d at 846.

The arbitrator specifically found (1) claimant was in the "odd lot" category, (2) he met his burden of proof that no reasonably stable labor market existed for persons in his circumstances, and (3) respondent failed to prove that such work existed on a regular and continuous basis. The arbitrator also found that further vocational rehabilitation was inappropriate. At the request of respondent, claimant underwent extensive vocational rehabilitation with Intracorp, Inc., beginning in February 1989.

On appeal, respondent does not contend that claimant was not injured as a result of the accident of July 28, 1988. Indeed, respondent does not contend claimant is not disabled or that the disability is not permanent. Respondent only contests the finding that the disability is total, suggesting that the cause be remanded for a determination of the extent of the claimant's permanent partial disability.

Dorothy Hunt of Intracorp opined that claimant could do light-duty factory work, but she also testified that he was cooperative with the rehabilitation effort and responded to over 270 job openings. No employment was located for claimant within the ...


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