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06/01/88 Eugene Mines, v. Olin Corporation

June 1, 1988

EUGENE MINES, PLAINTIFF

v.

OLIN CORPORATION, DEFENDANT (DAVY MCKEE CORPORATION, THIRD-PARTY PLAINTIFF-APPELLANT; MURER ELECTRIC, INC., THIRD-PARTY DEFENDANT-APPELLEE)



APPELLATE COURT OF ILLINOIS, FIRST DISTRICT, THIRD DIVISION

524 N.E.2d 1203, 171 Ill. App. 3d 246, 121 Ill. Dec. 155 1988.IL.858

Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County; the Hon. Willard J. Lassers, Judge, presiding.

APPELLATE Judges:

JUSTICE McNAMARA delivered the opinion of the court. WHITE, P.J., and RIZZI, J., concur.

DECISION OF THE COURT DELIVERED BY THE HONORABLE JUDGE MCNAMARA

Third-party plaintiff, Davy McKee Corp., filed a complaint against third-party defendant, Murer Electric, Inc., seeking indemnity and contribution for an injury incurred by a Murer employee, Eugene Mines. After McKee obtained a default judgment against Murer, the trial court subsequently granted the motion to quash service and dismiss the third-party complaint against Murer. McKee appeals from this order, contending that the trial court erred in granting a law firm leave to appear amicus curiae and subsequently granting the motion to quash service and dismiss the third-party complaint against Murer.

In April 1981, Mines filed a complaint against McKee and others for personal injuries resulting from an accident sustained while employed by Murer at the Olin Chemical plant. McKee was responsible for a storm water treatment project on the Olin site. An air reduction project was also in progress at the site.

In an effort to find out about Mines' injury, McKee served a subpoena on William Murer on April 6, 1982, requesting payroll records for Mines and copies of other contracts for work done on either the storm water treatment facility or the air reduction project for Olin. McKee received these documents on November 2, 1982. The records indicated that Mines was injured on the storm water treatment project.

On July 20, 1984, McKee filed a third-party complaint against Murer. Brian Murer, former president of Murer, was served with an alias summons on December 18, 1984. No appearance was filed on behalf of Murer. On March 4, 1985, McKee obtained a default judgment against Murer.

On January 30, 1987, the law firm of McKenna, Storer, Rowe, White & Farrug was granted leave to file its appearance amicus curiae. Thereafter, the McKenna firm brought a motion to quash the summons and dismiss the third-party complaint against Murer arguing that Murer did not have capacity to be sued by reason of section 94 of the Business Corporation Act (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1981, ch. 32, par. 157.94). This act limited to two years the time within which a corporation could be sued after its dissolution. (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1981, ch. 32, par. 157.94.) According to the motion, Murer dissolved as a corporation on December 1, 1980, and therefore McKenna argued that the third-party complaint filed 3 1/2 years after Murer's dissolution was untimely.

The trial court granted McKenna's motion to quash service and dismiss the third-party complaint on August 14, 1987. The trial court denied McKee's motion for reconsideration on September 21, 1987.

McKee's first argument on appeal is that the trial court erred in granting the McKenna firm leave to file an appearance amicus curiae and then allowing it to file a motion to quash service and dismiss the third-party complaint against Murer.

Historically, an amicus curiae is an impartial individual who suggests the interpretation and status of the law, gives information concerning it, and whose function is to advise in order that Justice may be done. (Leigh v. Engle (N.D. Ill. 1982), 535 F. Supp. 418.) By definition, an amicus curiae is not a party to the action, but a friend of the court. As such, the sole function of an amicus is to advise or make suggestions to the court. Fiorito v. Jones (1978), 72 Ill. 2d 73, 377 N.E.2d 1019, citing Bee Chemical Co. v. Service Coatings, Inc. (1969), 116 Ill. App. 2d 217, 253 N.E.2d 512.

In Leigh v. Engle, the trial court denied leave to file a memorandum amicus curiae by the Secretary of Labor in a case involving the Employee Retirement Act. The court denied leave after finding that the memorandum was in reality proffered in favor of the petitioner. The court in Leigh noted that the function of an amicus is to advise in order that Justice may be done, rather than to advocate a point of view so that a cause may be won by one party or another. (Leigh, 535 F. Supp. at 420.) The Leigh court found that the amicus memorandum injected an element of unfairness into the proceedings. ...


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