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MCCALL-BEY v. FRANZEN

May 14, 1984

LARRY MCCALL-BEY, PLAINTIFF,
v.
GALE FRANZEN, ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Bua, District Judge.

MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

This action is brought by Larry McCall-Bey against Michael Lane and six other Illinois Department of Corrections officials and employees pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983. In this civil rights action, McCall-Bey alleges violations of his right to procedural and substantive due process as guaranteed by the fourteenth amendment to the United States Constitution and seeks injunctive and monetary relief. Jurisdiction is based on 28 U.S.C. § 1343. Before this Court is McCall-Bey's motion for summary judgment against Lane on Counts III and IV of the Second Amended Complaint and Lane's cross-motion for summary judgment on the same counts. For the reasons stated herein, McCall-Bey's motion for partial summary judgment on Count III is granted and Lane's cross motion for summary judgment is denied. Also, McCall-Bey's motion for summary judgment on Count IV is denied and Lane's cross motion for summary judgment on Count IV is granted.

I.

McCall-Bey is currently an inmate at the Stateville Correctional Facility. He was an inmate at the Menard Correctional Facility at the time of the incidents alleged in the Second Amended Complaint. Lane was Warden of the Menard Correctional Facility at the time of the relevant incidents.

On June 23, 1977, McCall-Bey was accused of deviate sexual assault against another inmate. A third inmate had witnessed the assault and provided a statement to prison officials. This provided a basis for the statement of the witnessing officer. In addition, an investigation was conducted and an investigation report was prepared.

On July 14, 1977, the Adjustment Committee of the Menard Correctional Facility (the Committee) conducted a hearing regarding the alleged assault and found McCall-Bey guilty. The Committee prepared a summary of the hearing which stated the "basis for the decision/evidence relied upon" as the Committee's review of the charges, the ticket processed, the hearing held in compliance with A.R. 804, the statement of the witnessing officer, and the facts confirmed through the investigation report dated June 23, 1977. They then placed McCall-Bey on segregation status, reduced his grade to "C" and recommended that his job assignment be changed. On July 15, 1977, Lane approved the Committee's actions.

Count III of McCall-Bey's Second Amended Complaint is based upon the constitutional right to procedural due process under the fourteenth amendment. He alleges that the July 14, 1977 summary violated his constitutional rights because it provided neither the reasons for the disciplinary action taken nor a written statement by the factfinders as to the evidence relied upon by the Committee.

Count IV of the Second Amended Complaint is also based on the constitutional right to procedural due process under the fourteenth amendment. McCall-Bey alleges that the summary failed to meet administrative requirements and that such failure rises to the level of a constitutional due process violation. He claims Lane violated Illinois Department of Corrections Administrative Regulation 804(II)(B)(9) which requires that an inmate be given a written statement of the evidence relied upon by the Committee, the specific disciplinary action, and the reasons for the disciplinary action.

In an affidavit supporting his motion, McCall-Bey states that he was never given, and has not seen, a copy of the statement of the witnessing officer and that the witnessing officer did not testify at the July 14, 1977 Committee hearing. He also states that he was never given, and has not seen, a copy of the June 23, 1977 investigation report.

II.

Under Fed.R.Civ.P. 56, a motion for summary judgment will be granted if the pleadings and evidentiary material show that there is no genuine issue regarding any material fact and that the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law. The burden is upon the moving party to show that there is no issue of material fact in dispute. Rose v. Bridgeport Brass Co., 487 F.2d 804, 808 (7th Cir. 1973). All doubts as to the existence of an issue of material fact must be resolved against the movant. Moutoux v. Gulling Auto Electric, Inc., 295 F.2d 573, 577 (7th Cir. 1961). McCall-Bey's motion and Lane's cross-motion will be evaluated according to these principles.

III.

The protections of the due process clause are not lost when a person is incarcerated. Prisoners may not be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law. Wolff v. McDonnell, 418 U.S. 539, 556, 94 S.Ct. 2963, 2974, 41 L.Ed.2d 935 (1973). Thus, in a prison disciplinary hearing, a prisoner must be provided with "advance written notice of the claimed violation and a written statement of the factfindings as to the evidence relied upon and the reasons for the disciplinary action taken" in order to satisfy the minimum requirements of procedural due process. Wolff, 418 U.S. at 563, 94 S.Ct. at 2978. The reasons for these requirements are to protect an inmate from collateral consequences based on a misunderstanding of the original proceeding, to insure that administrators, faced with possible scrutiny by the public, state officials, and the court, will act fairly, and to prevent disadvantage to an inmate in propounding his own cause or defending himself from others. Id. at 565, 94 S.Ct. at 2979.

The contents of the summary are not in dispute. It merely states that the decision was based upon the ticket processed, the statement of the witnessing officer and facts confirmed through the June 23, 1977 investigation report. The ...


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