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People v. Grant

OPINION FILED FEBRUARY 19, 1982.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, PLAINTIFF-APPELLANT,

v.

RICK S. GRANT, DEFENDANT-APPELLEE.



APPEAL from the Circuit Court of Peoria County; the Hon. ROBERT E. MANNING, Judge, presiding.

JUSTICE BARRY DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT:

The defendant, Rick S. Grant, was arrested on August 20, 1980. A grand jury indicted him on August 26, 1980, on charges of arson and aggravated assault. (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1979, ch. 38, pars. 20-1(a) and 12-2(a)(1), respectively.) By February 4, 1981, the defendant had not been tried. The defendant moved for a dismissal of the indictment on the grounds that he was denied a speedy trial. (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1979, ch. 38, pars. 103-5(a), (d); 114-1(a)(1).) A hearing on the motion was held February 5, 1981, and the trial court granted the motion to dismiss. The defendant was ordered discharged from further proceedings. The People appeal on the grounds that the defendant occasioned the delay, such that he was not denied a speedy trial.

A recitation of the facts is necessary only insofar as they pertain to the issue on appeal. Following the indictment, on August 27, 1980, the cause was continued to September 3, 1980, upon the defendant's motion for additional time to retain private counsel. However, the defendant did not retain private counsel, and a public defender was appointed to represent him. The defendant was arraigned and pleaded not guilty to both counts on September 3, 1980. A jury trial was set for October 13, 1980.

On September 26, 1980, the defendant gave notice of his intention to plead the defense of insanity. On October 6, 1980, the defendant filed a motion for payment of expert witness fees, alleging that he was indigent and that he needed the services of a qualified psychiatrist to prepare his defense. The motion was granted on October 8, 1980, and Dr. Mortimer Beck, M.D., was appointed to examine the defendant to determine his state of mind at the time of the offense.

On the day set for trial, October 13, 1980, the People were prepared for trial; however, the defendant was not because he had not yet been examined by Dr. Beck. The court ordered the sheriff of Peoria County to transport the defendant to Dr. Beck's office for the purpose of examination on October 16, 1980. The trial judge put the case on a "day-to-day" call at this time, with no objection by either side. Dr. Beck's examination was conducted as scheduled.

The next order entered was on November 10, 1980, whereby the court, apparently upon defendant's oral motion of the same date, ordered the sheriff of Peoria County to transport the defendant to Dr. John E. Sheen's office. Dr. Sheen was to perform a second psychiatric examination of the defendant on November 12, 1980.

On January 28, 1981, there was an agreement to continue the matter until January 29, 1981. At that time the trial court raised the question of the 120-day rule. (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1979, ch. 38, par. 103-5(a).) The defendant then orally made a motion to dismiss the indictment based on the State's failure to provide him a speedy trial. A written motion for dismissal was filed on February 4, 1981. The court set February 5, 1981, for a hearing on the motion.

At the hearing on February 5, 1981, the assistant State's Attorney originally assigned to this case, William Holman, was called by the State to testify. His testimony corroborated what has been stated here. In addition, he stated that the People did not move for a continuance on October 13, 1980, nor was there any discussion of a trial date with the defense counsel, Frank Picl. Mr. Holman said further that he never made a motion to have the defendant examined. He never received any information or report from the defense as to the results of the examination by Dr. Beck.

William Holman assumed other duties, and the defendant's case was transferred to assistant State's Attorney Marcia Straub on December 15, 1980. Straub testified that she never made a motion for a continuance. Nor had she moved to have the defendant examined by a psychiatrist. She did not receive a copy of the reports concerning the psychiatric examinations.

Upon further questioning by the State, Straub said she discussed a plea with defense counsel, Frank Picl, on January 9, 1981. Picl told her the psychiatric examination was completed, and that he would discuss the plea offer with the defendant.

According to Straub, on January 29, 1981, the defense told her there would be no plea and a trial date should be set. However, as stated above, after the trial judge raised the question of the 120-day rule, the defense orally made its motion for dismissal on that basis. On cross-examination Straub stated that she did not take any steps toward setting a definite trial date, nor did the defense restrict her in that regard. Defense counsel also told her that the examination reports and medical testimony were not going to be used. Although there was a plea offer standing from January 9, 1981, Straub was not told by the defense to refrain from setting a trial date.

The defendant did not present any witnesses or evidence at the hearing. The trial court thereafter granted the motion, discharging the defendant. Specifically, the court determined that all delays elapsing between the date of the defendant's incarceration and January 28, 1981, were chargeable to the State, save the following, which were chargeable to the defendant:

(1) The 7-day period from August 27, 1980, when the defendant moved for a continuance, until September 3, 1980, when the public defender was appointed; and

(2) The 10-day period from October 6, 1980, when the defendant moved for payment of expert witness fees, until October 16, 1980, when ...


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