Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

In Re J.a.g.

OPINION FILED AUGUST 9, 1979.

IN RE J.A.G., A MINOR. — (THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, PETITIONER-APPELLEE,

v.

J.A.G., RESPONDENT-APPELLANT.)



APPEAL from the Circuit Court of St. Clair County; the Hon. ROBERT HAYES, Judge, presiding.

MR. JUSTICE KARNS DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT:

Respondent, J.A.G., a minor, appeals from the order of the Circuit Court of St. Clair County revoking his probation. His sole contention is that his confession to committing an act of burglary, which served as the basis for the revocation, was not voluntarily made.

On May 11, 1977, the minor was adjudged a delinquent under the Juvenile Court Act and was placed on probation for two years for committing the offense of theft. On August 25, 1977, the minor confessed to burglarizing the home of Mrs. Myrtle Winter on June 24, 1977. Thereafter, the State filed a petition to revoke the minor's probation, alleging the commission of that burglary. Respondent moved to suppress the confession, contending that he was not given his Miranda warnings prior to making the statement and further contending that he was induced to make the statement by promises of leniency. At the hearing on the motion to suppress, which motion was denied, and the subsequent revocation hearing, the following facts were presented.

Arnold Rujawitz, a juvenile officer with the Belleville Police Department, testified that on August 24, 1977, he and Officer Digus were investigating a series of burglaries in the area and went to see the minor at approximately 12:30 p.m. after receiving an anonymous tip that the minor might have some information about the alleged offenses. The officers asked the minor and one of his friends if they would go to the police station and have their fingerprints taken. The minor voluntarily complied with the officers' request even though he was informed that he need not go and be fingerprinted. When the minor was informed that his prints matched those found at the scene of one of the burglaries, Officer Rujawitz told him that he had a right to remain silent. The officer also informed the minor of the following rights:

"Q. [Assistant State's Attorney] What else did you tell him?

A. [Officer Rujawitz] We asked him if he understood his rights?

Q. Did you give him any other rights?

A. Yes, [J.A.G.] has been in enough and we have talked to [J.A.G.] enough. He knows he has a right to a lawyer.

Q. Did you tell him at that time?

A. Yes.

Q. Did you ask him whether or not he understood?

A. [J.A.G.] understands I am sure.

Q. Well, did you ask him that?

A. I asked him if he understood and [J.A.G.] didn't say too much. I have to take for granted he did. I can't ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.