Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Poulakidas v. Charalidis

OPINION FILED JANUARY 18, 1979.

THOMAS G. POULAKIDAS ET AL., PLAINTIFFS-APPELLEES,

v.

ELIAS CHARALIDIS ET AL., DEFENDANTS-APPELLANTS.



APPEAL from the Circuit Court of Cook County; the Hon. RAYMOND K. BERG, Judge, presiding.

MR. JUSTICE LINN DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT:

Plaintiffs, Niko Efstathiou, Thomas Poulakidas and The Maine Lobster House, Inc., brought this action for an accounting and dissolution of an alleged partnership operating The Maine Lobster House, Inc., a restaurant business. Defendant, Elias Charalidis, appeals from an interlocutory order granting plaintiffs' motion for the appointment of a receiver pendente lite to manage the restaurant's financial affairs. Defendant contends, inter alia, that it was error for the trial court to appoint a receiver pendente lite absent a clear showing of fraud or an imminent danger of dissipation or loss to the business assets.

We agree with the defendant, reverse the order appointing the receiver pendente lite, and remand the case for further proceedings.

The Maine Lobster House, Inc., is an Illinois corporation operating a restaurant in Chicago. In December 1975, defendant Charalidis and plaintiff Efstathiou acquired all of the outstanding shares of the corporation. Charalidis is the president of the corporation and Efstathiou, the secretary. Plaintiff Poulakidas is an attorney who represented Charalidis and Efstathiou in the purchase of the restaurant and in other matters relating to the business.

On March 20, 1978, plaintiffs Efstathiou and Poulakidas brought this action for an accounting and other related relief. The complaint was also filed on behalf of The Maine Lobster House, Inc. Chicago Title and Trust Company, trustee under a land trust agreement involving the restaurant building, was named as a nominal defendant.

Generally, the complaint alleged that plaintiffs and defendant had entered into an oral partnership agreement to purchase and operate The Maine Lobster House, Inc.; that plaintiffs had performed all their obligations under this agreement; that defendant had ousted plaintiffs from the business and that defendant had secretly appropriated profits and assets of the business without accounting to his partners. Plaintiffs sought an accounting and dissolution of the alleged partnership and requested temporary relief pending the termination of the litigation.

On March 23, 1978, plaintiffs moved the trial court for the appointment of a receiver pendente lite and other equitable relief to restrain the transfer or encumbrance of the business assets. At the April 7, 1978, hearing on that motion, defendant appeared specially, charging that he had not been properly served. The hearing on plaintiffs' motion was continued until April 19, 1978, during which time proper service was obtained on the defendant. The defendant filed an answer to the complaint, denying the material allegations of the complaint and alleging several matters as affirmative defenses.

The hearing on plaintiffs' motion for temporary relief commenced on April 19, 1978. We will highlight only the relevant testimony.

In September 1975, Charalidis and Efstathiou asked Poulakidas to assist them in acquiring The Maine Lobster House restaurant. Poulakidas and Efstathiou assert that the parties entered into an oral partnership to acquire the corporation and the option to purchase the improved real property containing the restaurant. It is maintained by plaintiffs that Poulakidas was to be an undisclosed partner in the venture. No written documents were presented which evidence a partnership, and defendant denies that the parties entered into such an agreement.

In December 1975, the parties purchased The Main Lobster House, Inc. The sellers of the restaurant business took back a $50,000 chattel mortgage. Poulakidas put up one-third of the cost of the business, his total investment being $20,000 and the performance of certain legal services on behalf of the corporation. In addition, Poulakidas guaranteed one loan to the business of $15,000 and co-signed a note for $14,000 along with Charalidis and Efstathiou. Charalidis contributed the balance of the money necessary to complete the purchase of the restaurant business. Efstathiou made no capital contribution. All of the outstanding shares of stock in the corporation are in the names of Charalidis and Efstathiou, but Poulakidas maintains he is entitled to receive shares from the others whenever he requests them.

In 1977, the business exercised the option to acquire the real property and building in which the restaurant is operated. Poulakidas participated in negotiations for a $200,000 loan from the National Bank of Greece to effectuate the purchase; however, Efstathiou and Charalidis later completed the purchase of the property without including Poulakidas in the transaction. Charalidis put up his own residence as additional collateral to secure the loan needed to purchase the restaurant building and property. Title to the real property is held in a land trust. Three-quarters of the beneficial interest is held by Charalidis and one-quarter by Efstathiou.

After the business was purchased in 1975, Charalidis and Efstathiou operated the restaurant on a daily basis and each drew a weekly salary of $300. Charalidis, who had more experience in the restaurant business, managed all the financial matters. The restaurant employed an accountant who maintained records and prepared tax returns for the business based only on information given him by Charalidis. This accountant was dismissed by Charalidis prior to the hearing, and a new accountant retained.

There is some dispute regarding the nature of the services rendered to the business by Efstathiou. However, it is undisputed that since November 1977, for health or other reasons, Efstathiou has neither worked in the restaurant nor drawn a salary. Since that time, Charalidis has managed the business exclusively. While Efstathiou was working in the restaurant, he entrusted the financial matters to Charalidis and signed batches of blank checks so that Charalidis could pay the bills. Although he claims to have been locked out of the restaurant by Charalidis, the restaurant is open daily and Efstathiou has made no attempt to return to the business. Several past and present employees of the restaurant testified that Charalidis works long hours and is a competent restauranteur.

The daily business transactions of the restaurant are accounted for by checks turned in by the waitresses at the end of the business day. The waitresses are checked out by Charalidis who records the checks and deposits the money in the bank. Charalidis also handles transactions with the credit card companies. Since Efstathiou has been absent from the business, only ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.