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Jamaica Inn, Inc. v. Daley

OPINION FILED OCTOBER 6, 1978.

JAMAICA INN, INC., ET AL., APPELLEES,

v.

RICHARD J. DALEY, MAYOR, ET AL., APPELLANTS. — PIGALLE LOUNGE, INC., ET AL., APPELLEES,

v.

RICHARD J. DALEY, MAYOR, ET AL., APPELLANTS.



Appeal from the Appellate Court for the First District; heard in that court on appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County, the Hon. Edward F. Healy, Judge, presiding.

MR. JUSTICE KLUCZYNSKI DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT:

On December 27, 1974, the liquor licenses of plaintiffs, Jamaica Inn, Inc. (Jamaica Inn), and Pigalle Lounge, Inc. (Pigalle), were revoked by the local liquor license commissioner for violations of Chicago ordinances. The license of Jamaica Inn was revoked for violations of an ordinance which prohibits liquor licensees or their employees from soliciting patrons to buy nonalcoholic drinks (Municipal Code of Chicago, ch. 147, secs. 147-15 to 147-15.2). The license of Pigalle was revoked for the same reason, but also because of a violation of an ordinance which prohibits nudity in a public place (Municipal Code of Chicago, ch. 192, sec. 192-8). The Liquor Appeal Commission of the city of Chicago consolidated the cases and sustained the revocations, and plaintiffs filed complaints for administrative review in the circuit court of Cook County. The circuit court upheld the Commission's decisions. On appeal to the appellate court, the judgment of the circuit court was reversed, and the ordinances were declared unconstitutional (53 Ill. App.3d 257). We granted defendants' petition for leave to appeal under Rule 315 (65 Ill.2d R. 315).

On several occasions in 1974, Chicago police officers visited the premises of the plaintiffs, Jamaica Inn and Pigalle, and witnessed the occurrences which led to revocation of plaintiffs' licenses. The details of each visit are contained in the appellate court opinion and need not be restated. A similar course of events was involved in each visit in which an officer was solicited. A waitress or dancer employed by the licensee would ask the officer if he desired a companion. In each instance the officer agreed and was joined by a female employee, usually a dancer. The officer would then be asked to buy a drink for his companion, and was charged as much as $3.75 per drink at Jamaica Inn and $4.20 per drink at Pigalle. The bartender and employees involved in the solicitation were arrested. Although some officers testified that the drinks appeared to be liquor, testimony did not clearly establish whether the drinks were in fact alcoholic. It will be assumed that they were not.

The instance of nudity which led to revocation of Pigalle's license also involved a simple factual setting. An officer entered the lounge and observed a female dancer who disrobed in the course of her performance. Upon completion of the performance, she was placed under arrest.

Following the arrests at Jamaica Inn and Pigalle, the licenses of both were revoked on the basis of the ordinance violations. The solicitation ordinance in question was promulgated under a chapter of the Chicago Municipal Code entitled "Liquor Dealers," pursuant to the States' authority to regulate the sale of liquor under the twenty-first amendment (U.S. Const., amend. XXI). The ordinance provides:

"For the purposes of this section, the following terms shall have the meaning ascribed to them in this sub-section:

A. Employee. The term `Employee' means any agent, manager, employee, entertainer, barkeeper, host, hostess, waiter, waitress or other person employed * * * on any contractual basis by such an establishment, or receiving any remuneration for services in such an establishment;

B. Licensed Establishment. The term `Licensed Establishment' means any place of business which has been issued a city license for the retail sale of alcoholic beverages;

C. Patron. The term `Patron' means any patron, customer, or visitor of a licensed establishment who is not employed by such establishment." Municipal Code of Chicago, ch. 147, sec. 147-15.

"No licensee or any employee of a licensee shall:

(a) Solicit, induce or request any patron of the licensed establishment to purchase any alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage for himself or any other employee of the licensed establishment; or

(b) Knowingly serve to any employee any alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage which was purchased by any patron." Municipal Code of Chicago, ch. 147, sec. 147-15.1.

"No licensee, manager or barkeeper of a licensed establishment shall permit any employee to remain on the premises of the licensed establishment who solicits, induces or requests a patron to purchase an alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage for any employee.

Nothing in this section prohibits the above activities where the patron and employee are related by blood or marriage." Municipal Code ...


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