Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

People v. Ford

OPINION FILED JULY 29, 1977.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, PLAINTIFF-APPELLEE,

v.

ROBERT FORD ET AL., DEFENDANTS-APPELLANTS.



APPEAL from the Circuit Court of McDonough County; the Hon. SCOTT I. KLUKOS, Judge, presiding.

MR. PRESIDING JUSTICE ALLOY DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT:

Rehearing denied August 29, 1977.

Defendants Robert Ford and Michael Simpson appeal from convictions of theft of property valued in excess of $150. Defendant Ford was sentenced to two years probation conditioned, in part, upon payment of a $1,000 fine and court costs. Defendant Simpson was sentenced to a term of one to three years imprisonment. On appeal in this court, defendants argue that the trial court erred in denying defendants' motion to suppress their confessions, on the ground that the confessions followed the illegal arrest of defendants.

It appears from the record that on October 17, 1975, an information was filed in the Circuit Court of McDonough County which charged that on October 17, 1975, defendants, along with Jack Koontz, stole over $150 worth of soybeans from Phil Marshall and Charles Flack, in violation of section 16-1 of the Criminal Code of 1961 (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1975, ch. 38, par. 16-1).

On December 15, 1975, defendants filed motions to suppress their confessions, and alleged that the confessions were involuntary due to the defendants' ingestion of LSD. After a hearing, the trial court denied the motions.

Trial of the case was begun before a jury on February 19, 1976. While the State's second witness was testifying, defense counsel renewed his motion to suppress the confessions. Defense counsel argued that the testimony of the witnesses raised a question regarding whether the police had probable cause to arrest defendants, and that if the arrest were without probable cause, the confessions would be inadmissible. After a discussion about the timeliness of defendants' challenge, the trial court excused the jury and conducted a hearing on the issue raised.

Testimony was heard at the hearing from Phil Marshall, the owner of the soybeans which were allegedly stolen by defendants, and from Sheriff John Bliven of McDonough County, who arrested defendants. The testimony indicated that, at the time Sheriff Bliven arrested defendants on October 17, 1975, the sheriff did not know that defendants had stolen the beans from Phil Marshall, and that the sheriff first learned that the beans were in fact stolen from Phil Marshall when defendants confessed on the morning of their arrest.

The evidence, however, did show that on October 17, 1975, Sheriff Bliven received radio notification from the Mason County Sheriff's Office that three young boys in a yellow pickup truck had attempted to sell soybeans at two grain elevators in Havana; that the elevator operators had declined to purchase the beans because they were suspicious of the boys; and that the boys had left Havana in the truck, crossing a bridge and heading west into Fulton County. Sheriff Bliven also testified that he was informed by the Mason County Sheriff's Office that one of the boys had given the name "Bobby Ford" at one of the elevators, and that another of the boys wore a red and black plaid coat. There was also a stolen vehicle report on the pickup truck.

Sheriff Bliven testified that after he had received the information as to the thefts by radio, he rode east from Macomb, toward Fulton County and into Fulton County with the intention of intercepting the truck. While the sheriff was on this route, he received a radio message from the Fulton County Sheriff's Office that one of the boys and the truck were at an elevator in Ipava, Fulton County, and that the boy was using the name "Bobby Ford." It was also noted that Sheriff Bliven was familiar with defendant Ford, who resided in Bardolph, near Macomb, McDonough County. The sheriff testified that as he was then driving down Main Street in Ipava, he noted defendant Ford, who was known to the sheriff, and defendant Simpson, who was wearing a red and black plaid coat, were sitting on a bench. He then placed defendants under arrest. Sheriff Bliven then drove, with the defendants, to the grain elevator in Ipava, where Sheriff Ellsworth of Fulton County had just taken Jack Koontz into custody and where the yellow pickup truck was located.

The sheriff subsequently transported defendants to the McDonough County Sheriff's Office, where defendant Simpson orally confessed to the theft of the soybeans and directed the sheriff to the location from which the beans had been stolen. As Sheriff Bliven arrived at the site of the theft, Phil Marshall was discovering the theft of the beans, but had not previously communicated the theft to any police agency. After Sheriff Bliven returned from the Marshall farm, Bliven took written confessions of the theft from defendant Simpson at 9:20 a.m., from defendant Ford at 10:40 a.m., and, after transporting Jack Koontz from the Fulton County Sheriff's Office, from Koontz at 2:30 p.m., all on October 17, 1975.

After presentation of the foregoing testimony and following arguments of counsel, the trial court ruled that Sheriff Bliven had possessed probable cause to arrest defendants, and the trial thereafter resumed in the presence of the jury. The jury heard testimony from Mr. Marshall, who testified to the apparent loss of soybeans from a storage bin on his farm; from an investigator with the State's Attorney's office, who testified to the sale by defendants of 53 bushels of soybeans from the pick-up truck to a Macomb elevator for $4.80 per bushel; and from Sheriff Bliven who testified concerning statements by the boys (admitting the theft of the beans) taken from defendants and Koontz. The statements of defendants and Koontz were admitted into evidence over the objection of defendants.

At the close of the evidence, the jury found defendants and Koontz guilty of theft of property having a value of $254.13. The trial court, as we have noted, sentenced defendant Ford to two years probation, conditioned, in part, upon payment of a $1,000 fine and court costs, and sentenced defendant Simpson to a term of one to three years imprisonment. Koontz was convicted along with defendants but moved to sever his case and dismiss his appeal.

On appeal in this court, defendants Ford and Simpson argue that their motion to suppress their confessions should have been granted in view of the fact that the confessions followed their arrest, which was illegal, they contend, because the State failed to demonstrate the reliability of the radio bulletins upon which Sheriff Bliven relied in arresting defendants.

• 1, 2 It is noted that section 114-12(a) of the Code of Criminal Procedure of 1963 (Ill. Rev. Stat. 1975, ch. 38, ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.