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People v. Johnson

MARCH 6, 1975.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, PLAINTIFF-APPELLEE,

v.

ROBERT JOHNSON, DEFENDANT-APPELLANT.



APPEAL from the Circuit Court of Cook County; the Hon. EARL STRAYHORN, Judge, presiding.

MR. PRESIDING JUSTICE MCGLOON DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT:

Defendant, Robert Johnson, was indicted for armed robbery and unlawful use of weapons in connection with the robbery on October 14, 1972, of the Avalon Wall Paper and Paint Company located at 1854 East 79th Street in Chicago. After a jury trial, defendant was found guilty on both counts and sentenced to concurrent terms of 4 to 12 years for armed robbery and 2 to 3 years for unlawful use of weapons. Defendant now appeals.

On appeal the defendant contends that (1) the trial court erred in refusing to hear defendant's pretrial motion to suppress evidence; (2) the court erred in not suppressing complainant's in-court identification of defendant; (3) the conduct of the trial court judge prevented the defendant from receiving a fair trial; (4) there is a reasonable doubt of the defendant's guilt; and (5) the sentences are vague and ambiguous and constitute reversible error.

We affirm.

Complainant in the instant case, Lewis Lowy, testified that on Sunday, October 14, 1972, at approximately 2 P.M., he was working alone in his store, the Avalon Wall Paper and Paint Company, when two men entered the store, approached him and asked to see certain paints they had discussed the day before. Mr. Lowy indicated that these same two men had been in the store the previous day for 30 or 40 minutes and had left just before closing when Mr. Lowy's son entered the store. As Mr. Lowy turned to obtain the requested information, one of the men, later identified by Lowy as Robert James, announced "This is a stick-up," put his arm around Lowy's neck and started going through Lowy's pockets. James' companion, identified by Lowy as defendant Robert Johnson, then pulled out a sawed-off shotgun from a shopping bag he was carrying, put the gun to Lowy's head and ordered him to move to the rear of the store, threatening Lowy with death if he made any noise. After tying Mr. Lowy to a water pipe in the rear of the store, the two men emptied the store's cash register and fled with $62 of the store's receipts plus a small pocket book taken from the store's lost and found and Mr. Lowy's wallet containing his driver's license, social security card and various credit cards.

Mrs. Dorothy Cunningham, security manager at the Carson Pirie Scott store located at 9700 South Western Avenue in Evergreen Park, Illinois, testified that at approximately 3:15 or 3:30 P.M. the day of the robbery, she observed Robert James and Robert Johnson selecting men's apparel at the above Carson Pirie Scott store. Mrs. Cunningham indicated further that James attempted to purchase the clothing with a Carson Pirie Scott charge plate bearing the name of "Lewis Lowy." After James forged Mr. Lowy's signature on the sales receipt, Mrs. Cunningham examined the receipt and asked James if he was indeed Lewis Lowy. When James responded that he was not, security guards were summoned, defendant and Robert James were apprehended, and various credit cards bearing the name of Lewis Lowy were recovered, along with a small pocket book and $16 in currency.

One of the investigating officers, Officer Parker, testified that after he and his partner placed James and Johnson under arrest, they accompanied Johnson to a parking lot at 95th Street and Western Avenue in Evergreen Park where they discovered a 1969 Mercury parked along the lot's east wall. From the trunk of the Mercury the officers recovered a sawed-off shotgun which was later identified by Mr. Lowy as the gun that was used in the robbery.

In the evening of the day of the robbery, a lineup was held in which Mr. Lowy positively identified both James and Johnson as the two men who had robbed him earlier in the day. Mr. Lowy also identified the items recovered from James and Johnson as the ones that had been taken from him in the robbery.

This appeal is brought only by Johnson. On the third day of the 6-day trial, co-defendant James, who had been released on bond, did not appear and forfeited his bond. James was found guilty and sentenced in absentia to 2 to 8 years for armed robbery and 2 to 3 years for unlawful use of weapons.

Defendant's first contention is that the trial court erred in refusing to hear a pretrial motion to suppress the shotgun recovered from the trunk of the 1969 Mercury. Defendant argues that the court denied the motion to suppress without hearing any evidence on the motion. Defendant further argues that no motion to suppress was heard at a preliminary hearing, but only what purports to be a motion to suppress. In support of this unique contention, defendant urges that the discussion of the shotgun at the preliminary hearing came as an afterthought by defendant's attorney, that there was no formal motion made in writing and that in the preliminary hearing the court did all of the interrogating concerning the recovery of the shotgun.

• 1 The record indicates that a motion to suppress, although not in writing, was fully considered at the preliminary hearing. In the case at bar, when the motion to suppress the shotgun was raised anew in the trial court, defendant made no offer of proof indicating additional evidence was to be offered or tending to show the existence of special circumstances. In such a case, it was not error for the trial court to refuse to reconsider defendant's motion to suppress. See People v. Holland (1974) 56 Ill.2d 318, 307 N.E.2d 380; People v. Hopkins (1972) 52 Ill.2d 1, 284 N.E.2d 283.

Defendant next contends that the court erred in denying his pretrial motion to suppress Mr. Lowy's in-court identification of defendant. In support of this contention defendant argues that his identification in the police lineup was replete with police-induced activities.

• 2, 3 After carefully reading the record we do not agree with defendant's contention that the lineup was replete with police-induced activities. However, even if the defendant were correct in so contending, the trial court did not err in denying defendant's motion to suppress Mr. Lowy's in-court identification because Mr. Lowy's identification had an origin independent of the allegedly unfair lineup. As stated in People v. Martin (1970), 47 Ill.2d 331, 338, 265 N.E.2d 685, 689:

"* * * [E]ven though an out-of-court procedure may have been unnecessarily suggestive, nonetheless, denial of due process depends on whether * * * identification at trial was dependent on or influenced by the improper viewing and that the question to be determined is whether the witness's identification had an origin independent of the improperly suggestive ...


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