Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Hamilton v. Family Record Plan

MAY 17, 1966.

JOHN HAMILTON, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF VIRGINIA C. HAMILTON, DECEASED, AND ROY A. SANOR, JR., AS FATHER AND NEXT FRIEND OF VICTORIA SANOR, A MINOR, PLAINTIFFS-APPELLANTS,

v.

FAMILY RECORD PLAN, INC., A CORPORATION, AND MICHAEL T. LOGULLO, DEFENDANTS-APPELLEES.



Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County; the Hon. WILLIAM V. DALY, Judge, presiding. Judgments reversed and cause remanded with directions.

MR. PRESIDING JUSTICE BRYANT DELIVERED THE OPINION OF THE COURT.

Rehearing denied June 7, 1966.

This appeal comes from a judgment order entered December 23, 1964, granting the post-trial motion of the defendants for a judgment notwithstanding the verdict. The defendant below, Family Record Plan, has filed an appearance in this court; Michael T. Logullo, also a defendant below, has not filed an appearance in this appeal.

This action was brought by John Hamilton, individually and as the administrator of the estate of Virginia C. Hamilton, his deceased wife, and by Roy A. Sanor, Jr. as father and next friend of Victoria Sanor, a minor. Roy A. Sanor is the son-in-law of John Hamilton, Victoria Sanor being, therefore, the granddaughter of John Hamilton.

The evidence shows that John Hamilton, his wife, Virginia, and their granddaughter Victoria, were driving on the way downtown when they were involved in an automobile accident with the defendant Michael T. Logullo. John Hamilton and Victoria Sanor were injured; Virginia Hamilton was killed. The testimony of John Hamilton concerning this occurrence is abstracted as follows:

"As I approached the intersection of 86 and Euclid, I was proceeding in an Easterly direction. In the block prior to the intersection, the speed of my automobile was less than 25 miles an hour. I slowed the car down as we approached the intersection and I looked to the right and I looked to the left, and by that time we started into the intersection; and I looked to the right and then looked ahead. I saw no cross-traffic coming at that time. My speed as I passed through the intersection was less than twenty miles an hour.

"When I was in the intersection a car hit me in the right front of the right front door.

"86th Street is two ways. With respect to an imaginary center line on 86th Street, . . . I was to the right of the center line. I was on the right-hand side of the street. Euclid Avenue is a two-way street. I saw this automobile just before he struck me. He was on the right-hand side of Euclid."

On cross-examination he testified, "[At the time I entered the intersection] I could see down Euclid Avenue 75 to 80 feet. There was something to obstruct my vision. There was a car parked along the West curb. One car — that car obstructed my vision. That car was parked about 30 feet South of 86th Street. 30 feet South of the sidewalk."

Hamilton said that when the police questioned him about the accident, the following question was asked and he gave this answer:

"Q. Now, go ahead in your own way and tell how the accident happened.

"A. I was driving East on 86th Street approximately 25 miles an hour or less. Approaching Euclid Avenue, I slowed down, saw nothing coming, and my wife said `all right,' so I continued into the intersection. All of a sudden my car was struck and we were all thrown into the street. That's all."

This was the only testimony concerning the accident.

The following evidence was adduced concerning the relationship between Michael T. Logullo and the Family Record Plan. In a deposition given in Statesville Penitentiary where he was serving a sentence for armed robbery, Michael T. Logullo testified that his first contact with the Family Record Plan came in 1957 when he was 18 years old. The Family Record Plan dealt with the door-to-door selling of photograph albums for baby pictures. He said he first met Richard Shipley and later, in October of 1957 met Nathan Silvers. Shipley was the field manager for the Family Record Plan, and Silvers was his immediate superior. At this time, Logullo attended a sales meeting which was held in a south side restaurant. Present were Shipley, Silvers, Logullo and about half a dozen other persons including one Allen Curtis whom Logullo had known for about five years. After this and other meetings, Logullo signed an "Independent Contractors" agreement. That agreement provides that the dealer must sell at least one album each week, that the company agrees to lease ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.