Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Cook v. Suburban Cas Co.

SEPTEMBER 14, 1964.

EVA F. COOK AND CHARLES L. COOK, PLAINTIFFS-APPELLANTS,

v.

SUBURBAN CASUALTY COMPANY, DEFENDANT-APPELLEE.



Appeal from the Circuit Court of Jefferson County; the Hon. CASWELL J. CREBS, Judge, presiding. Affirmed.

WRIGHT, JUSTICE.

This case was tried before the court without a jury on a stipulated set of facts. The trial court entered a judgment for the defendant and the plaintiffs bring this appeal.

It is agreed that on May 4, 1961, Abbie Gentry owned a 1946 Ford automobile and a 1950 Plymouth automobile, both of which were insured under Policy No. FIL 37288, for bodily injury liability with Suburban Casualty Company, the defendant. The 1946 Ford automobile was described in the policy as the owned automobile with applicable bodily injury liability limits of $20,000 each person and $40,000 each occurrence. The 1950 Plymouth automobile was described in an endorsement attached to the policy as an additional automobile with applicable bodily injury liability limits of $10,000 each person and $20,000 each occurrence. Abbie Gentry owned no other automobiles at that time.

On or about May 5, 1961, Abbie Gentry traded the 1950 Plymouth automobile for a 1955 Nash automobile and on May 6, 1961, he notified the agent of the defendant of this trade and substitution. The agent then issued a transfer endorsement to the policy on May 6, 1961, changing the description of the automobile covered by the policy from the 1950 Plymouth automobile to the 1955 Nash automobile. None of the other provisions of either the basic policy or the additional automobile endorsement were changed and no additional premium was charged for this transfer.

On May 25, 1961, while this policy of insurance was in force, the plaintiff, Eva F. Cook, was injured while riding as a guest passenger in the 1955 Nash automobile which was being driven by Robert Gentry. Thereafter, a suit was brought in the Circuit Court of Jefferson County, Illinois, by plaintiffs, Eva F. Cook and Charles L. Cook, against Abbie Gentry and Robert Gentry. This suit resulted in a judgment in the amount of $20,000 in favor of plaintiff, Eva F. Cook, and against Abbie Gentry and Robert Gentry, and a judgment in the amount of $3,000 in favor of Charles L. Cook and against Abbie Gentry and Robert Gentry.

The defendant, on January 26, 1963, tendered to the plaintiff the sum of $10,179.05 claiming this was the full amount of the policy limit plus interest applicable to the judgments. Plaintiff refused to accept this sum and defendant filed a petition for leave to deposit this sum with the Clerk of the Court. A hearing was held and an order authorizing the deposit was entered. This contract action was then brought by the plaintiff against the defendant to collect the balance due under the judgment of $23,000.

Plaintiffs argue there is in effect two contracts of insurance and that since the 1955 Nash automobile was purchased by Abbie Gentry less than thirty days prior to the accident, it is a Newly Acquired Automobile under the definitions in the policy and is insured both under the provisions of the policy applicable to the 1946 Ford automobile and under the provisions of the policy applicable to the 1950 Plymouth automobile.

In construing a policy of insurance, courts should consider the instrument as a whole, and endeavor to ascertain the intention of the parties from the written language used, taking into account the situation of the parties, the nature of the subject matter with which they are dealing, and the purpose which the parties sought to accomplish. Jackson v. Country Mut. Ins. Co., 41 Ill. App.2d 300, 190 N.E.2d 490; Allstate Ins. Co. v. Conglis, 33 Ill. App.2d 370, 179 N.E.2d 434.

In both the Change of Automobile Endorsement and Transfer Endorsement attached to the policy it is stated, "This Endorsement is subject to all of the terms, conditions and exclusions of the Policy which are not inconsistent herewith. . . Attached to and forming part of Policy No. FIL 37288, issued to Abbie Gentry by the Suburban Casualty Company, Wheaton, Illinois." The language is clear and unambiguous that the parties intended to insure two automobiles for different bodily injury liability limits under one contract.

Policies must be construed according to the sense and meaning of the terms used and if the language is clear and unambiguous must be taken in its plain, ordinary and popular sense. The rule of liberal construction of insurance policies in favor of the insured as summarized in Mosby v. Mutual Life Ins. Co., of New York, 405 Ill. 599, 92 N.E.2d 103, must yield to rules of reasonable construction and the rule construing ambiguous provisions strictly against the insurer will not permit perversion of plain language to create an ambiguity where none, in fact, exist. Miller v. Madison County Mut. Automobile Ins. Co., 46 Ill. App.2d 413, 197 N.E.2d 153; Thompson v. Fidelity & Cas. Co. of New York, 16 Ill. App.2d 159, 148 N.E.2d 9.

Under the policy in this case, the defendant, Suburban Casualty Company, agreed with the insured, Abbie Gentry, under Part I — Liability — Coverage A:

"To pay on behalf of the insured all sums which the insured shall become legally obligated to pay as damages because of bodily injury, . . . sustained by any person arising out of the ownership, maintenance or use of the owned automobile. . ."

The policy also defines certain terms and in Definitions Under Part I, ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.