Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

MONAGAS v. ALBERTUCCI

November 30, 1914

MONAGAS
v.
ALBERTUCCI



APPEAL FROM THE SUPREME COURT OF PORTO RICO

White, McKenna, Holmes, Day, Hughes, Van Devanter, Lamar, Pitney, McReynolds

Author: White

[ 235 U.S. Page 81]

 MR. CHIEF JUSTICE WHITE delivered the opinion of the court.

Only that which is deemed necessary for the decision of the case is stated, bearing in mind that our power is confined

[ 235 U.S. Page 82]

     to determining whether error of law was committed in admitting or rejecting evidence and whether the findings of fact are adequate to sustain the conclusions based on them. Rosaly v. Graham, 227 U.S. 584, 590.

The appellants sued in August, 1909, to recover immovable property upon the ground that a contract of sale made by them of the property in September, 1906, subject to a right to redeem was not a sale subject to condition, but a mortgage, and, therefore, although the period for redemption had long expired without the exercise of that right, they were entitled to a decree for cancellation of the recorded sale on payment of the mortgage debt. Moreover, a right to recover rents and revenues was sought for the purpose of imputing the amount to the extinction of the mortgage debt. At the trial Juan A. Monagas, one of the plaintiffs, was tendered in their behalf as a witness and he was permitted to testify over objection made and exception reserved by the defendant. The court substantially awarded the relief prayed. The prayer, however, for an accounting was denied upon the ground that, although there was no agreement as to rate of interest, nevertheless it was contemplated that the lender should go into possession of the property, collect the rents and revenues and appropriate them in lieu of collecting interest on the debt. Both sides appealed.

On the appeal it developed in the argument that neither side had complied with the rules as to assigning errors. The case was heard and taken under advisement with leave to file assignments of errors within a time fixed. In its opinion the court came first to the appeal of the defendant below. Directing attention to the fact that the permission to file assignments had not been complied with, the court then considered what was open, and after referring to the exception concerning the testimony of the witness offered for the purpose of showing that the deed was not a sale but was a mortgage, treated the exception

[ 235 U.S. Page 83]

     as covering two considerations; first, Was parol evidence admissible, "under our Civil Code, to vary the terms of the sale?" and second, whether "An improper construction was put on the written contract entered into between the parties," evidently considering, therefore, that even if parol evidence was admissible, it was yet necessary as a result of the exception to determine whether the contract had been improperly construed by a wrongful effect given to the evidence admitted over objection.

The contention as to mere inadmissibility was at once disposed of by stating that the real question to be decided was not whether any testimony could have been received but the character and probative force of that which was admissible. The court said (17 Porto Rico, 684, 686):

"The whole case really turns on the question whether the written instrument in controversy was a mortgage or a conditional sale. If it is the latter, it must be complied with according to its terms; if the former, the plaintiff must be allowed to repay the money received and take a reconveyance of the land. The real intention of the parties at the time the written instrument was made must govern in the interpretation given to it by the courts. This must be ascertained from the circumstances surrounding the transaction and from the language of the document itself. The correct test, where it can be applied, is the continued existence of a debt or liability between the parties. If such exists, the conveyance may be held to be merely a security for the debt or indemnity against the liability. On the contrary, if no debt or liability is found to exist, then the transaction is not a mortgage, but merely a sale with a contract of repurchase within a fixed time. While every case depends on its ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.