Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

METCALF v. BARKER

December 1, 1902

METCALF
v.
BARKER



CERTIFICATE FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND CIRCUIT

Fuller, Harlan, Brewer, Brown, Shiras, Jr., White, Peckham, McKenna

Author: Fuller

[ 187 U.S. Page 171]

 MR. CHIEF JUSTICE FULLER, after making the foregoing statement, delivered the opinion of the court.

Metcalf Brothers & Company, judgment creditors of Lesser Brothers, commenced their creditors' suit in the Supreme Court of New York, December 17, 1896. The case came to trial December 17, 1897, and decree was rendered April 6, 1898. 22 Misc. Rep. 664. On appeal the appellate division affirmed the judgment of the trial court in part, and reversed it in part, and directed the payment by the receivers to Metcalf Brothers & Company of the amount of their judgments out of the money in the receivers' hands. 35 App. Div. 596. This decree or judgment was embodied in an other dated December 30, 1898, but the clerk of the Supreme Court appears not to have entered it until January 31, 1899. The decision of the Court of Appeals, 161 N.Y. 587, was made February 6, 1900, and the remittitur was received and filed in the court below March 12, 1900.

The bankruptcy law was approved July 1, 1898. May 12, 1899, Lesser Brothers filed their petition in bankruptcy and were adjudicated bankrupts, and Barker was appointed trustee June 7, 1899. March 8, 1900, the bankrupts' trustee procured from the District Court an order entitled in the bankruptcy proceedings requiring Metcalf Brothers & Company to show cause on March 13 why a writ of injunction should not issue enjoining them from taking any further proceedings under any judgment in their creditors' action, and so enjoining them in the interim, which injunction, after argument on the merits, was continued. No question arises here in respect of real estate, and on the case stated in the certificate the property affected was equitable assets. There had been tangible personal property,

[ 187 U.S. Page 172]

     subject to levy and sale under execution, but this had been previously sold by an order of the Supreme Court of New York and the proceeds were held by receivers.

The general rule is that the filing of a judgment creditors' bill and service of process creates a lien in equity on the judgment debtor's equitable assets. Miller v. Sherry, 2 Wall. 237; Freedman's Savings & Trust Company v. Earle, 110 U.S. 710. And such is the rule in New York. Storm v. Waddell, 2 Sandf. Ch. 494; Lynch v. Johnson, 48 N.Y. 27; First National Bank v. Shuler, 153 N.Y. 163. This was conceded by the District Court, but the court held that the lien so created was "contingent upon the recovery of a valid judgment, and liable to be defeated by anything that defeats the judgment, or the right of the complainants to appropriate the fund;" that "such a contingent or equitable lien, it is evident, cannot be superior to the judgment on which it depends to make it effectual, but must stand or fall with the judgment itself;" and that "section 67 f, therefore, in declaring that a judgment recovered within four months 'shall be deemed null and void,' etc., necessarily prevents the complainants from acquiring any benefit from the lien, or the fund attached, except through the trustee in bankruptcy pro rata with other creditors," it being also held that, although the judgment at special term was rendered more than four months before the filing of the petition, yet that the judgment of the appellate division, as affirmed by the Court of Appeals, was within the four months. 100 Fed. Rep. 433.

Assuming that the judgment at special term is to be disregarded, and that the judgment of the appellate division was entered within the four months, it will be perceived that if the views of the District Court were correct, the third question propounded should be answered in the negative, while if incorrect, that question should be answered in the affirmative.

Doubtless the lien created by a judgment creditors' bill is contingent in the sense that it might possibly be defeated by the event of the suit, but in itself, and so long as it exists, it is a charge, a specific lien, on the assets, not subject to being divested save by payment of the judgment sought to be collected.

[ 187 U.S. Page 173]

     The subject was fully discussed and the effect of bankruptcy proceedings considered by Vice Chancellor Sandford in Storm v. Waddell, 2 Sandf. Ch. 494, which has been repeatedly recognized with approval as to have become a leading case.

As Mr. Justice Swayne remarked in Miller v. Sherry, the commencement of the suit amounts to an equitable levy, 2 Wall. 249; or, in the language of Mr. Justice Matthews, in Freedman's Savings & Trust Company v. Earle, "It is the execution first begun to be executed, unless otherwise regulated by statute, which is entitled to priority. The filing of the bill, in cases of equitable execution, is the beginning of executing it." 110 U.S. 717. And the right to payment out of the fund so vested cannot be affected by a subsequent transfer by the debtor, McDermutt v. Strong, 4 Johns. Ch. 687, or taken away by a ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.