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SCHRIMPSCHER v. STOCKTON.

decided: January 6, 1902.

SCHRIMPSCHER
v.
STOCKTON.



ERROR TO THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF KANSAS.

Author: Brown

[ 183 U.S. Page 292]

 MR. JUSTICE BROWN delivered the opinion of the court.

This case turns upon the proper construction of article XV of a treaty with a number of tribes of Indians, including "certain Wyandott," concluded February 23, 1867, and proclaimed October 14, 1868. 15 Stat. 513, 517.

The facts of the case are substantially as follows:

On January 31, 1855, 10 Stat. 1159, the United States entered into a treaty with the Wyandott Indians, by the second article of which they ceded to the United States certain lands purchased by them of the Delawares, the object of which cession was that "the said lands shall be subdivided, assigned and reconveyed, by a patent, in fee simple, in the manner hereinafter provided for, to the individuals and members of the Wyandotte Nation, in severalty." By the third article, provision was made for a survey of the lands, the appointment of commissioners to divide the lands among the individuals of the tribe, and to make up lists of all the individuals and members of the tribe, "which lists shall exhibit, separately, first, those families, the heads of which the commissioners, after due inquiry and consideration, shall be satisfied are sufficiently intelligent, competent and prudent to control and manage their affairs and interests, and also all persons without families; second, those families, the heads of which are not competent and proper persons to be entrusted with their shares of the money payable under this agreement; and third, those who are orphans, idiots or insane." Article four provided for the issue of unconditional patents in fee simple to those reported by the commissioners to be competent to be entrusted with the control and management of their affairs and interests; "but to those not so competent, the patents shall contain an express condition that the lands are not to be sold or alienated for a period of five years; and not then, without the express consent of the President of the United States first being obtained," etc.

[ 183 U.S. Page 293]

     Margaret C. Cherloe was a Wyandotte Indian of the competent class, and as such she was given, under the treaty of 1855, allotment No. 42, to sixty-four acres of the land originally sued for, and received a patent therefor in fee simple, without restriction as to conveyance. This patent was dated June 1, 1859.

After the issue of such patent, and prior to August 31, 1863, Margaret C. Cherloe died intestate, leaving her grandson, Carey Rodgers, as her only heir at law, and on August 31, 1863, the said Carey Rodgers made a deed in fee simple of the land so inherited to Jesse Cooper and Mary E. Stockton.

Carey Rodgers, being himself a Wyandotte Indian, belonging to the incompetent class by reason of being an orphan, was given allotment No. 278, containing fifty-seven acres, and on September 1, 1859, received a patent for said lands, containing the following condition: "That the said tract shall never be sold or conveyed by the grantee or his heirs without the consent of the Secretary of the Interior for the time being, and with the further and express condition, as specified in the fourth article of the treaty with the Wyandottes of the 31st of January, 1855, that the lands are not to be sold or alienated for a period of five years."

On November 15, 1864, the said Carey Rogers executed a deed in fee simple of this last-mentioned land to Jesse Cooper and Mary E. Stockton, covenanting that he was seized in fee simple and had good right to sell the same.

On February 25, 1869, by a partition of that date by Jesse Cooper and his wife, and Mary E. Stockton and her husband, there was conveyed to Mary E. Stockton the lands sued for in this action and described in the petition. Defendants took title from her.

The said Carey Rodgers died intestate in December, 1867, at the age of 21.

Immediately after the execution of the deeds from Carey Rodgers to Jesse Cooper and Mary E. Stockton the grantees took possession of all the land described in said deeds under claim of title and ownership by virtue of said deeds; made ...


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